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Preparing to approach or avoid alcohol: EEG correlates, and acute alcohol effects

Overview of attention for article published in Neuroscience Letters, January 2014
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (81st percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (90th percentile)

Mentioned by

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9 tweeters

Citations

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10 Dimensions

Readers on

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32 Mendeley
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Title
Preparing to approach or avoid alcohol: EEG correlates, and acute alcohol effects
Published in
Neuroscience Letters, January 2014
DOI 10.1016/j.neulet.2013.12.003
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ozlem Korucuoglu, Thomas E. Gladwin, Reinout W. Wiers

Abstract

Recently an approach-bias for alcohol has been described as an important cognitive motivational process in the etiology of alcohol use problems. In the approach-bias, perception and action are inextricably linked and stimulus response associations are central to this bias: performance improves when task instructions are congruent with a pre-existing stimulus-response association. These pre-existing response associations could potentially allow advance response preparation and execution. The present study aimed at investigating the effect of the alcohol approach bias on response preparation by means of event-related desynchronization in the beta band (beta-ERD) of the EEG signal and the effect of acute alcohol in the approach bias in response to alcohol cues. Subjects (18 social drinkers) performed an adapted alcohol-Approach Avoidance Task, in which a preparatory period was provided between alcohol/soft drink cues and approach/avoid responses. Subjects were tested both in a placebo and in an alcohol condition (counterbalanced). Posterior beta-ERD was found to increase during preparation for alcohol-approach trials. The beta-ERD in the congruent block increased following alcohol administration. These results suggest that advance response preparation may play a role in the alcohol approach bias and that acute alcohol facilitates response preparatory processes for approach alcohol trials. Future EEG studies using the adapted AAT may help understanding approach biases in addiction.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 9 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 32 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Germany 1 3%
Switzerland 1 3%
Brazil 1 3%
United States 1 3%
Unknown 28 88%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 28%
Researcher 7 22%
Student > Master 4 13%
Professor 3 9%
Unspecified 3 9%
Other 6 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 13 41%
Unspecified 5 16%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 9%
Neuroscience 3 9%
Social Sciences 2 6%
Other 6 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 6. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 December 2013.
All research outputs
#2,539,373
of 12,057,012 outputs
Outputs from Neuroscience Letters
#1,027
of 5,484 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#37,235
of 202,201 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Neuroscience Letters
#5
of 52 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,057,012 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 78th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,484 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.0. This one has done well, scoring higher than 81% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 202,201 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 81% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 52 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.