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The complete genome sequence of a Neanderthal from the Altai Mountains

Overview of attention for article published in Nature, December 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Citations

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1065 Dimensions

Readers on

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1674 Mendeley
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9 CiteULike
Title
The complete genome sequence of a Neanderthal from the Altai Mountains
Published in
Nature, December 2013
DOI 10.1038/nature12886
Pubmed ID
Authors

Kay Prüfer, Fernando Racimo, Nick Patterson, Flora Jay, Sriram Sankararaman, Susanna Sawyer, Anja Heinze, Gabriel Renaud, Peter H. Sudmant, Cesare de Filippo, Heng Li, Swapan Mallick, Michael Dannemann, Qiaomei Fu, Martin Kircher, Martin Kuhlwilm, Michael Lachmann, Matthias Meyer, Matthias Ongyerth, Michael Siebauer, Christoph Theunert, Arti Tandon, Priya Moorjani, Joseph Pickrell, James C. Mullikin, Samuel H. Vohr, Richard E. Green, Ines Hellmann, Philip L. F. Johnson, Hélène Blanche, Howard Cann, Jacob O. Kitzman, Jay Shendure, Evan E. Eichler, Ed S. Lein, Trygve E. Bakken, Liubov V. Golovanova, Vladimir B. Doronichev, Michael V. Shunkov, Anatoli P. Derevianko, Bence Viola, Montgomery Slatkin, David Reich, Janet Kelso, Svante Pääbo

Abstract

We present a high-quality genome sequence of a Neanderthal woman from Siberia. We show that her parents were related at the level of half-siblings and that mating among close relatives was common among her recent ancestors. We also sequenced the genome of a Neanderthal from the Caucasus to low coverage. An analysis of the relationships and population history of available archaic genomes and 25 present-day human genomes shows that several gene flow events occurred among Neanderthals, Denisovans and early modern humans, possibly including gene flow into Denisovans from an unknown archaic group. Thus, interbreeding, albeit of low magnitude, occurred among many hominin groups in the Late Pleistocene. In addition, the high-quality Neanderthal genome allows us to establish a definitive list of substitutions that became fixed in modern humans after their separation from the ancestors of Neanderthals and Denisovans.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 454 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 1,674 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 30 2%
Germany 13 <1%
United Kingdom 12 <1%
Brazil 8 <1%
Spain 7 <1%
France 6 <1%
Netherlands 4 <1%
Turkey 4 <1%
Canada 4 <1%
Other 35 2%
Unknown 1551 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 424 25%
Researcher 303 18%
Student > Bachelor 270 16%
Student > Master 214 13%
Professor 93 6%
Other 273 16%
Unknown 97 6%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 711 42%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 339 20%
Arts and Humanities 104 6%
Social Sciences 92 5%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 41 2%
Other 234 14%
Unknown 153 9%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1669. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 April 2020.
All research outputs
#1,894
of 15,139,386 outputs
Outputs from Nature
#291
of 73,931 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#28
of 261,105 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nature
#5
of 916 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,139,386 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 73,931 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 82.7. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 261,105 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 916 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.