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The growing number of female physicians: meanings, values, and outcomes

Overview of attention for article published in Israel Journal of Health Policy Research, December 2013
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Mentioned by

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2 tweeters

Citations

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7 Dimensions

Readers on

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16 Mendeley
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Title
The growing number of female physicians: meanings, values, and outcomes
Published in
Israel Journal of Health Policy Research, December 2013
DOI 10.1186/2045-4015-2-47
Pubmed ID
Authors

Susan P Phillips

Abstract

Throughout the developed world the proportion of women in professions such as medicine is increasing. This commentary uses Haklai et al's nuanced report on the feminization of medicine in Israel as a starting point. I discuss whether gender shifts are an outcome of more egalitarian attitudes towards women overall, or instead arise from men choosing other professions, the extent of the shift, and its meaning for the quantity and quality of medical care. The discussion is embedded in more fundamental concepts such as the aims of medical practice and the best indicators of effective care. I reflect on concerns about lower female physician productivity at a time when the proportion of female physicians still remains below parity in almost all countries. Medicine is embedded in the principles and expectations of the community being served. The profession's values and practices both shape and are shaped by those of that larger community. As cultures move toward equality, proportional representation of women and men in medicine will follow, while remaining limitations to gender equality will be mirrored in opportunities and restrictions for women in medicine. This is a commentary on http://www.ijhpr.org/content/2/1/37/.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 16 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 16 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 3 19%
Student > Master 3 19%
Lecturer > Senior Lecturer 2 13%
Researcher 2 13%
Other 1 6%
Other 3 19%
Unknown 2 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 6 38%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 19%
Social Sciences 2 13%
Psychology 1 6%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 1 6%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 3 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 25 April 2016.
All research outputs
#11,716,651
of 15,356,089 outputs
Outputs from Israel Journal of Health Policy Research
#215
of 420 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#173,431
of 262,781 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Israel Journal of Health Policy Research
#29
of 37 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,356,089 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 420 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.0. This one is in the 39th percentile – i.e., 39% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 262,781 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 30th percentile – i.e., 30% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 37 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 13th percentile – i.e., 13% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.