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Medial Parietal Cortex Activation Related to Attention Control Involving Alcohol Cues

Overview of attention for article published in Frontiers in Psychiatry, December 2013
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Title
Medial Parietal Cortex Activation Related to Attention Control Involving Alcohol Cues
Published in
Frontiers in Psychiatry, December 2013
DOI 10.3389/fpsyt.2013.00174
Pubmed ID
Authors

Gladwin, Thomas Edward, ter Mors – Schulte, Mieke HJ, Ridderinkhof, K Richard, Wiers, Reinout W

Abstract

Automatic attentional engagement toward and disengagement from alcohol cues play a role in alcohol use and dependence. In the current study, social drinkers performed a spatial cueing task designed to evoke conflict between such automatic processes and task instructions, a potentially important task feature from the perspective of recent dual-process models of addiction. Subjects received instructions either to direct their attention toward pictures of alcoholic beverages, and away from non-alcohol beverages; or to direct their attention toward pictures of non-alcoholic beverages, and away from alcohol beverages. Instructions were varied per block. Activation in medial parietal cortex was found during "approach alcohol" versus "avoid-alcohol" blocks. This region is associated with the, possibly automatic, shifting of attention between stimulus features. Subjects thus appeared to shift attention away from certain features of alcoholic cues when attention had to be directed toward their location. Further, activation in voxels located close to this region was negatively correlated with riskier drinking behavior. A tentative interpretation of the results is that risky drinking may be associated with a reduced automatic tendency to shift attention away from potentially distracting task-irrelevant alcohol cues. Future study is needed to test this interpretation, and to further determine the role of medial posterior regions in automatic alcohol-related attentional processes in general.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 26 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Netherlands 2 8%
Germany 1 4%
Iran, Islamic Republic of 1 4%
Unknown 22 85%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 10 38%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 19%
Student > Master 3 12%
Professor 2 8%
Student > Bachelor 2 8%
Other 4 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 13 50%
Medicine and Dentistry 4 15%
Unspecified 3 12%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 8%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 4%
Other 3 12%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 December 2013.
All research outputs
#9,138,942
of 11,409,977 outputs
Outputs from Frontiers in Psychiatry
#1,319
of 1,554 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#130,455
of 193,740 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Frontiers in Psychiatry
#43
of 46 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,409,977 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,554 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.5. This one is in the 4th percentile – i.e., 4% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 46 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.