↓ Skip to main content

The Effect of Dog-Assisted Intervention on Student Well-Being, Mood, and Anxiety

Overview of attention for article published in International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, May 2017
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (83rd percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (79th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
3 tweeters
facebook
6 Facebook pages
video
1 video uploader

Citations

dimensions_citation
48 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
246 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
The Effect of Dog-Assisted Intervention on Student Well-Being, Mood, and Anxiety
Published in
International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, May 2017
DOI 10.3390/ijerph14050483
Pubmed ID
Authors

Dasha Grajfoner, Emma Harte, Lauren Potter, Nicola McGuigan

Abstract

This novel, exploratory study investigated the effect of a short, 20 min, dog-assisted intervention on student well-being, mood, and anxiety. One hundred and thirty-two university students were allocated to either an experimental condition or one of two control conditions. Each participant completed the Warwick-Edinburgh Mental Well-Being Scale (WEMBS), the State Trait Anxiety Scale (STAI), and the UWIST Mood Adjective Checklist (UMACL) both before, and after, the intervention. The participants in the experimental condition interacted with both the dogs and their handlers, whereas the control groups interacted with either the dog only, or the handler only. The analyses revealed a significant difference across conditions for each measure, with those conditions in which a dog was present leading to significant improvements in mood and well-being, as well as a significant reduction in anxiety. Interestingly, the presence of a handler alongside the dog appeared to have a negative, and specific, effect on participant mood, with greater positive shifts in mood being witnessed when participants interacted with the dog alone, than when interacting with both the dog and the handler. These findings show that even a short 20 min session with a therapy dog can be an effective alternative intervention to improve student well-being, anxiety, and mood.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 246 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 <1%
Unknown 245 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 50 20%
Student > Master 43 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 22 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 17 7%
Researcher 16 7%
Other 38 15%
Unknown 60 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 63 26%
Nursing and Health Professions 23 9%
Medicine and Dentistry 21 9%
Social Sciences 15 6%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 12 5%
Other 44 18%
Unknown 68 28%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 12. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 06 June 2021.
All research outputs
#2,427,230
of 21,352,585 outputs
Outputs from International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
#3,290
of 22,102 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#46,223
of 283,451 outputs
Outputs of similar age from International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
#57
of 273 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,352,585 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 88th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 22,102 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.1. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 283,451 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 83% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 273 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 79% of its contemporaries.