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Breast cancer and amyloid bodies: is there a role for amyloidosis in cancer-cell dormancy?

Overview of attention for article published in Breast cancer targets and therapy, April 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#18 of 138)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (82nd percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (69th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
twitter
2 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
2 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
11 Mendeley
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Title
Breast cancer and amyloid bodies: is there a role for amyloidosis in cancer-cell dormancy?
Published in
Breast cancer targets and therapy, April 2017
DOI 10.2147/bctt.s131394
Pubmed ID
Authors

Gerald Mizejewski

Abstract

Breast cancer and Alzheimer's disease (AD) are major causes of death in older women. Interestingly, breast cancer occurs less frequently in AD patients than in the general population. Amyloidosis, the aggregation of amyloid proteins to form amyloid bodies, plays a central role in the pathogenesis of AD and other human neuropathies by forming intracellular fibrillary proteins. Contrary to popular belief, amyloidosis is a common occurrence in mammalian cells, and has recently been reported to be a natural physiological process in response to environmental stress stimulations (such as pH and temperature extremes, hypoxia, and oxidative stress). Many proteins contain an intrinsic "amyloid-converting motif", which acts in conjunction with a specific noncoding RNA to induce formation of proteinaceous amyloid bodies that are stored in intracellular bundles. In cancer cells such as breast and prostate, the process of amyloidosis induces cells to enter a dormant or resting stage devoid of cell division and proliferation. Therefore, cancer cells undergo growth cessation and enter a dormant stage following amyloidosis in the cell; this is akin to giving the cell AD to cease growth.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 11 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 11 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 4 36%
Student > Bachelor 2 18%
Professor 1 9%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 9%
Student > Postgraduate 1 9%
Other 2 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 5 45%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 9%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 9%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 9%
Physics and Astronomy 1 9%
Other 2 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 10. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 May 2017.
All research outputs
#1,118,828
of 10,490,471 outputs
Outputs from Breast cancer targets and therapy
#18
of 138 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#45,233
of 264,373 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Breast cancer targets and therapy
#4
of 13 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 10,490,471 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 89th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 138 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.8. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 264,373 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 82% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 13 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 69% of its contemporaries.