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Archaea Appear to Dominate the Microbiome of Inflatella pellicula Deep Sea Sponges

Overview of attention for article published in PLOS ONE, December 2013
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (79th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (77th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
10 tweeters
googleplus
1 Google+ user

Citations

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38 Dimensions

Readers on

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88 Mendeley
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Title
Archaea Appear to Dominate the Microbiome of Inflatella pellicula Deep Sea Sponges
Published in
PLOS ONE, December 2013
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0084438
Pubmed ID
Authors

Stephen A. Jackson, Burkhardt Flemer, Angela McCann, Jonathan Kennedy, John P. Morrissey, Fergal O’Gara, Alan D. W. Dobson

Abstract

Microbes associated with marine sponges play significant roles in host physiology. Remarkable levels of microbial diversity have been observed in sponges worldwide through both culture-dependent and culture-independent studies. Most studies have focused on the structure of the bacterial communities in sponges and have involved sponges sampled from shallow waters. Here, we used pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes to compare the bacterial and archaeal communities associated with two individuals of the marine sponge Inflatella pellicula from the deep-sea, sampled from a depth of 2,900 m, a depth which far exceeds any previous sequence-based report of sponge-associated microbial communities. Sponge-microbial communities were also compared to the microbial community in the surrounding seawater. Sponge-associated microbial communities were dominated by archaeal sequencing reads with a single archaeal OTU, comprising ~60% and ~72% of sequences, being observed from Inflatella pellicula. Archaeal sequencing reads were less abundant in seawater (~11% of sequences). Sponge-associated microbial communities were less diverse and less even than any other sponge-microbial community investigated to date with just 210 and 273 OTUs (97% sequence identity) identified in sponges, with 4 and 6 dominant OTUs comprising ~88% and ~89% of sequences, respectively. Members of the candidate phyla, SAR406, NC10 and ZB3 are reported here from sponges for the first time, increasing the number of bacterial phyla or candidate divisions associated with sponges to 43. A minor cohort from both sponge samples (~0.2% and ~0.3% of sequences) were not classified to phylum level. A single OTU, common to both sponge individuals, dominates these unclassified reads and shares sequence homology with a sponge associated clone which itself has no known close relative and may represent a novel taxon.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 10 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 88 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Germany 2 2%
Portugal 1 1%
Spain 1 1%
Unknown 84 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 22 25%
Researcher 21 24%
Student > Master 11 13%
Student > Bachelor 8 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 5%
Other 15 17%
Unknown 7 8%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 37 42%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 14 16%
Environmental Science 10 11%
Immunology and Microbiology 6 7%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 4 5%
Other 9 10%
Unknown 8 9%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 6. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 February 2015.
All research outputs
#4,892,871
of 20,587,020 outputs
Outputs from PLOS ONE
#53,392
of 177,689 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#61,786
of 296,726 outputs
Outputs of similar age from PLOS ONE
#1,797
of 7,918 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 20,587,020 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 76th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 177,689 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 14.4. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 69% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 296,726 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 79% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 7,918 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 77% of its contemporaries.