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Potential for Waterborne and Invertebrate Transmission of West Nile Virus in the Great Salt Lake, Utah

Overview of attention for article published in Applied and Environmental Microbiology, May 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (67th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (57th percentile)

Mentioned by

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2 tweeters
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page

Citations

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1 Dimensions

Readers on

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23 Mendeley
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Title
Potential for Waterborne and Invertebrate Transmission of West Nile Virus in the Great Salt Lake, Utah
Published in
Applied and Environmental Microbiology, May 2017
DOI 10.1128/aem.00705-17
Pubmed ID
Authors

Melissa Lund, Valerie Shearn-Bochsler, Robert J. Dusek, Jan Shivers, Erik Hofmeister

Abstract

In November and December of 2013, a large mortality event involving 15,000 - 20,000 eared grebes (Podiceps nigricollis) occurred at the Great Salt Lake (GSL), UT. The onset of the outbreak in grebes was followed by a mortality event in > 86 bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus). During the die-off, West Nile virus (WNV) was detected by RT-PCR or viral culture in carcasses of grebes and eagles submitted to the National Wildlife Health Center. However, no mosquito activity, the primary vector of WNV, was detected by the State of Utah's WNV monitoring program. Transmission of WNV has rarely been reported during the winter in North America in the absence of known mosquito activity; however, the size of this die-off, the habitat in which it occurred, and the species involved are unique. We experimentally investigated whether WNV could survive in water with a high saline content, as found at the GSL, and whether brine shrimp, the primary food of migrating eared grebes on the GSL, could have played a role in transmission of WNV to feeding birds. We found that WNV can survive up to 72 h at 4°C in water containing 30 - 150 ppt NaCl and brine shrimp, incubated with WNV in 30 ppt NaCl, may adsorb WNV to their cuticle and, through feeding, may infect epithelial cells of their gut. Both mechanisms may have potentiated the WNV die-off in migrating eared grebes on the GSL.IMPORTANCE Following a major West Nile virus die-off of eared grebes and bald eagles at the Great Salt Lake (GSL), UT in November -- December, 2013, this study assessed the survival of West Nile virus (WNV) in water as saline as the GSL and whether brine shrimp, the major food for migrating grebes, could have played a role as vectors for the virus. While mosquitoes are the major vector of WNV, under certain circumstances transmission may occur through contaminated water and invertebrates as food.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 23 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 23 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 9 39%
Other 3 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 13%
Professor 1 4%
Student > Bachelor 1 4%
Other 3 13%
Unknown 3 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 8 35%
Immunology and Microbiology 3 13%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 3 13%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 9%
Environmental Science 2 9%
Other 1 4%
Unknown 4 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 29 January 2018.
All research outputs
#3,317,089
of 12,508,562 outputs
Outputs from Applied and Environmental Microbiology
#3,351
of 9,509 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#82,928
of 260,365 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Applied and Environmental Microbiology
#51
of 122 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,508,562 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 73rd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 9,509 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.9. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 64% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 260,365 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 67% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 122 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 57% of its contemporaries.