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Metagenomic analysis of microbial consortium from natural crude oil that seeps into the marine ecosystem offshore Southern California

Overview of attention for article published in Standards in Genomic Sciences, January 2014
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  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (70th percentile)

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5 tweeters
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1 Facebook page

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52 Mendeley
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Title
Metagenomic analysis of microbial consortium from natural crude oil that seeps into the marine ecosystem offshore Southern California
Published in
Standards in Genomic Sciences, January 2014
DOI 10.4056/sigs.5029016
Pubmed ID
Authors

Erik R. Hawley, Hailan Piao, Nicole M. Scott, Stephanie Malfatti, Ioanna Pagani, Marcel Huntemann, Amy Chen, Tijana Glavina del Rio, Brian Foster, Alex Copeland, Janet Jansson, Amrita Pati, Susannah Tringe, Jack A. Gilbert, Thomas D. Lorenson, Matthias Hess

Abstract

Crude oils can be major contaminants of the marine ecosystem and microorganisms play a significant role in the degradation of its main constituents. To increase our understanding of the microbial hydrocarbon degradation process in the marine ecosystem, we collected crude oil from an active seep area located in the Santa Barbara Channel (SBC) and generated a total of about 52 Gb of raw metagenomic sequence data. The assembled data comprised ~500 Mb, representing ~1.1 million genes derived primarily from chemolithoautotrophic bacteria. Members of Oceanospirillales, a bacterial order belonging to the Deltaproteobacteria, recruited less than 2% of the assembled genes within the SBC metagenome. In contrast, the microbial community associated with the oil plume that developed in the aftermath of the Deepwater Horizon (DWH) blowout in 2010, was dominated by Oceanospirillales, which comprised more than 60% of the metagenomic data generated from the DWH oil plume. This suggests that Oceanospirillales might play a less significant role in the microbially mediated hydrocarbon conversion within the SBC seep oil compared to the DWH plume oil. We hypothesize that this difference results from the SBC oil seep being mostly anaerobic, while the DWH oil plume is aerobic. Within the Archaea, the phylum Euryarchaeota, recruited more than 95% of the assembled archaeal sequences from the SBC oil seep metagenome, with more than 50% of the sequences assigned to members of the orders Methanomicrobiales and Methanosarcinales. These orders contain organisms capable of anaerobic methanogenesis and methane oxidation (AOM) and we hypothesize that these orders - and their metabolic capabilities - may be fundamental to the ecology of the SBC oil seep.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 52 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Brazil 3 6%
United States 1 2%
Australia 1 2%
Mexico 1 2%
Unknown 46 88%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 18 35%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 15%
Student > Bachelor 6 12%
Professor > Associate Professor 3 6%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 6%
Other 7 13%
Unknown 7 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 23 44%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 8 15%
Environmental Science 5 10%
Chemistry 2 4%
Immunology and Microbiology 2 4%
Other 4 8%
Unknown 8 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 January 2015.
All research outputs
#2,404,189
of 6,798,714 outputs
Outputs from Standards in Genomic Sciences
#103
of 393 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#50,498
of 176,068 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Standards in Genomic Sciences
#3
of 4 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 6,798,714 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 63rd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 393 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.0. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 73% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 176,068 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 70% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 4 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one.