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Ten-year survival rate after rotational acetabular osteotomy in adulthood hip dysplasia

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, May 2017
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Title
Ten-year survival rate after rotational acetabular osteotomy in adulthood hip dysplasia
Published in
BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, May 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12891-017-1556-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Masamitsu Tomioka, Yutaka Inaba, Naomi Kobayashi, Taro Tezuka, Hyonmin Choe, Hiroyuki Ike, Tomoyuki Saito

Abstract

Rotational acetabular osteotomy (RAO) is an effective joint-preserving surgical treatment for adulthood hip dysplasia (AHD). Despite sufficient correction of acetabular dysplasia, some patients still experience osteoarthritis (OA) progression and require total hip arthroplasty (THA). The purposes of the current study were to investigate the survival rate and the risk factors for OA progression or THA requirement after RAO and to explore whether acetabular overcorrection relates to OA progression. Fifty-six patients (65 hips, mean age: 36.5 ± 11.7 years) with AHD who underwent RAO and were followed up for >10 years (mean: 15.0 ± 3.2 years) were enrolled in this study. A Kaplan-Meier survival analysis was performed to assess the non-OA progression rate and THA-free survival rate of RAO during the 10-year follow-up. To analyze the risk factors for OA progression and THA requirement, the Cox proportional hazards regression analysis was performed. No OA progression was found in 76.7% of the patients, and THA was not required in 92.3% during the 10-year follow-up. By multivariate regression analysis, older age at the time of surgery was a risk factor for both OA progression (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.047, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.005-1.091) and THA requirement (HR = 1.293, 95% CI = 1.041-1.606). RAO is an effective surgical procedure for symptomatic patients with AHD that prevents OA progression and protects the hips from undergoing THA. However, older patients have a higher risk for both OA progression and THA requirement.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 17 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 17 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 4 24%
Student > Master 2 12%
Professor 1 6%
Student > Bachelor 1 6%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 6%
Other 4 24%
Unknown 4 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 10 59%
Social Sciences 1 6%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 6%
Engineering 1 6%
Unknown 4 24%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 May 2017.
All research outputs
#7,800,310
of 10,393,133 outputs
Outputs from BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders
#1,643
of 2,302 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#172,737
of 264,668 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders
#50
of 59 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 10,393,133 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 21st percentile – i.e., 21% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,302 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.5. This one is in the 21st percentile – i.e., 21% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 264,668 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 28th percentile – i.e., 28% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 59 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 6th percentile – i.e., 6% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.