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Antimicrobial Prescribing in Dogs and Cats in Australia: Results of the Australasian Infectious Disease Advisory Panel Survey

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine, May 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#35 of 1,535)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (87th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (97th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
twitter
9 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
7 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
51 Mendeley
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Title
Antimicrobial Prescribing in Dogs and Cats in Australia: Results of the Australasian Infectious Disease Advisory Panel Survey
Published in
Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine, May 2017
DOI 10.1111/jvim.14733
Pubmed ID
Authors

Hardefeldt, L.Y., Holloway, S., Trott, D.J., Shipstone, M., Barrs, V.R., Malik, R., Burrows, M., Armstrong, S., Browning, G.F., Stevenson, M., L.Y. Hardefeldt, S. Holloway, D.J. Trott, M. Shipstone, V.R. Barrs, R. Malik, M. Burrows, S. Armstrong, G.F. Browning, M. Stevenson

Abstract

Investigations of antimicrobial use in companion animals are limited. With the growing recognition of the need for improved antimicrobial stewardship, there is urgent need for more detailed understanding of the patterns of antimicrobial use in this sector. To investigate antimicrobial use for medical and surgical conditions in dogs and cats by Australian veterinarians. A cross-sectional study was performed over 4 months in 2011. Respondents were asked about their choices of antimicrobials for empirical therapy of diseases in dogs and cats, duration of therapy, and selection based on culture and susceptibility testing, for common conditions framed as case scenarios: 11 medical, 2 surgical, and 8 dermatological. A total of 892 of the 1,029 members of the Australian veterinary profession that completed the survey satisfied the selection criteria. Empirical antimicrobial therapy was more common for acute conditions (76%) than chronic conditions (24%). Overall, the most common antimicrobial classes were potentiated aminopenicillins (36%), fluoroquinolones (15%), first- and second-generation cephalosporins (14%), and tetracyclines (11%). Third-generation cephalosporins were more frequently used in cats (16%) compared to dogs (2%). Agreement with Australasian Infectious Disease Advisory Panel (AIDAP) guidelines (generated subsequently) was variable ranging from 0 to 69% between conditions. Choice of antimicrobials by Australian veterinary practitioners was generally appropriate, with relatively low use of drugs of high importance, except for the empirical use of fluoroquinolones in dogs, particularly for otitis externa and 3rd-generation cephalosporins in cats. Future surveys will determine whether introduction of the 2013 AIDAP therapeutic guidelines has influenced prescribing habits.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 9 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 51 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Japan 1 2%
Unknown 50 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Postgraduate 10 20%
Other 10 20%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 14%
Researcher 6 12%
Professor 4 8%
Other 14 27%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 21 41%
Medicine and Dentistry 10 20%
Immunology and Microbiology 6 12%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 8%
Unspecified 3 6%
Other 7 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 14. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 February 2018.
All research outputs
#849,786
of 11,642,880 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine
#35
of 1,535 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#34,406
of 266,682 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine
#1
of 49 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,642,880 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 92nd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,535 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.3. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 266,682 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 49 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.