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Rethinking physical activity communication: using focus groups to understand women’s goals, values, and beliefs to improve public health

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, May 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#47 of 10,912)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (96th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
27 news outlets
blogs
3 blogs
twitter
62 tweeters
facebook
6 Facebook pages
googleplus
2 Google+ users

Citations

dimensions_citation
22 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
85 Mendeley
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Title
Rethinking physical activity communication: using focus groups to understand women’s goals, values, and beliefs to improve public health
Published in
BMC Public Health, May 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12889-017-4361-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Michelle Segar, Jennifer M. Taber, Heather Patrick, Chan L. Thai, April Oh

Abstract

Communication about physical activity (PA) frames PA and influences what it means to people, including the role it plays in their lives. To the extent that PA messages can be designed to reflect outcomes that are relevant to what people most value experiencing and achieving in their daily lives, the more compelling and effective they will be. Aligned with self-determination theory, this study investigated proximal goals and values that are salient in everyday life and how they could be leveraged through new messaging to better support PA participation among women. The present study was designed to examine the nature of women's daily goals and priorities and investigate women's PA beliefs, feelings, and experiences, in order to identify how PA may compete with or facilitate women's daily goals and priorities. Preliminary recommendations are proposed for designing new PA messages that align PA with women's daily goals and desired experiences to better motivate participation. Eight focus groups were conducted with White, Black, and Hispanic/Latina women aged 22-49, stratified by amount of self-reported PA (29 low active participants, 11 high active participants). Respondents discussed their goals, values, and daily priorities along with beliefs, feelings about and experiences being physically active. Data were collected, coded, and analyzed using a thematic analysis strategy to identify emergent themes. Many of the goals and values that both low and high active participants discussed as desiring and valuing map on to key principles of self-determination theory. However, the discussions among low active participants suggested that their beliefs, feelings, experiences, and definitions of PA were in conflict with their proximal goals, values, and priorities, also undermining their psychological needs for autonomy, competence, and relatedness. Findings from this study can be used to inform and evaluate new physical activity communication strategies that leverage more proximal goals, values, and experiences of happiness and success to better motivate PA among ethnically diverse low active women. Specifically, this research suggests a need to address how women's daily goals and desired experiences may undermine PA participation, in addition to framing PA as facilitating rather than competing with their daily priorities and desired leisure-time experiences.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 62 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 85 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
New Zealand 1 1%
Unknown 84 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 19 22%
Student > Master 18 21%
Student > Doctoral Student 13 15%
Researcher 9 11%
Student > Bachelor 8 9%
Other 7 8%
Unknown 11 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 15 18%
Social Sciences 14 16%
Psychology 13 15%
Medicine and Dentistry 11 13%
Sports and Recreations 6 7%
Other 13 15%
Unknown 13 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 281. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 January 2020.
All research outputs
#58,451
of 15,880,134 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#47
of 10,912 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#2,111
of 268,999 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#1
of 27 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,880,134 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 10,912 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 12.0. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 268,999 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 27 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.