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Antiepileptic drugs for the treatment of infants with severe myoclonic epilepsy

Overview of attention for article published in Cochrane database of systematic reviews, May 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (90th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (66th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
21 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page

Citations

dimensions_citation
6 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
75 Mendeley
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Title
Antiepileptic drugs for the treatment of infants with severe myoclonic epilepsy
Published in
Cochrane database of systematic reviews, May 2017
DOI 10.1002/14651858.cd010483.pub4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Francesco Brigo, Stanley C Igwe, Nicola Luigi Bragazzi

Abstract

This is an updated version of the original Cochrane review published in 2015, Issue 10.Severe myoclonic epilepsy in infants (SMEI), also known as Dravet syndrome, is a rare, refractory form of epilepsy, for which stiripentol (STP) has been recently licensed as add-on therapy. To evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of STP and other antiepileptic drug treatments (including ketogenic diet) for patients with SMEI. For the latest update we searched the Cochrane Epilepsy Group Specialized Register (20 December 2016), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) via the Cochrane Register of Studies Online (CRSO, 20 December 2016), MEDLINE (Ovid, 1946 to 20 December 2016) and ClinicalTrials.gov (20 December 2016). Previously we searched the World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform ICTRP, but this was not usable at the time of this update. We also searched the bibliographies of identified studies for additional references. We handsearched selected journals and conference proceedings and imposed no language restrictions. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) or quasi-randomised controlled trials; double- or single-blinded or unblinded trials; and parallel-group studies. Administration of at least one antiepileptic drug therapy given singly (monotherapy) or in combination (add-on therapy) compared with add-on placebo or no add-on treatment. Review authors independently selected trials for inclusion according to predefined criteria, extracted relevant data and evaluated the methodological quality of trials. We assessed the following outcomes: 50% or greater seizure reduction, seizure freedom, adverse effects, proportion of dropouts and quality of life. We assessed outcomes by using a Mantel-Haenszel meta-analysis to calculate risk ratios (RRs) with 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs). Since the last version of this review no new studies have been found. Specifically, we found no RCTs assessing drugs other than STP. The review includes two RCTs evaluating use of STP (total of 64 children). Both studies were generally at unclear risk of bias. A significantly higher proportion of participants had 50% or greater reduction in seizure frequency in the STP group compared with the placebo group (22/33 versus 2/31; RR 10.40, 95% CI 2.64 to 40.87). A significantly higher proportion of participants achieved seizure freedom in the STP group compared with the placebo group (12/33 versus 1/31; RR 7.93, 95% CI 1.52 to 41.21). Investigators found no significant differences in proportions of dropouts from the STP group compared with the placebo group (2/33 versus 8/31; RR 0.24, 95% CI 0.06 to 1.03). Only one study explicitly reported the occurrence of side effects, noting that higher proportions of participants in the STP group experienced side effects than in the placebo group (100% versus 25%; RR 3.73, 95% CI 1.81 to 7.67). We rated the quality of the evidence as low to moderate according to GRADE criteria, as most information is from studies judged to be at an unclear risk of bias. Data derived from two small RCTs indicate that STP is significantly better than placebo with regards to 50% or greater reduction in seizure frequency and seizure freedom. Adverse effects occurred more frequently with STP. Additional adequately powered studies with long-term follow-up should be conducted to unequivocally establish the long-term efficacy and tolerability of STP in the treatment of patients with SMEI.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 21 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 75 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Ethiopia 1 1%
South Africa 1 1%
Unknown 73 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 21 28%
Researcher 10 13%
Unspecified 9 12%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 11%
Student > Bachelor 8 11%
Other 19 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 32 43%
Unspecified 16 21%
Nursing and Health Professions 8 11%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 5 7%
Psychology 4 5%
Other 10 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 23. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 September 2018.
All research outputs
#713,956
of 13,459,952 outputs
Outputs from Cochrane database of systematic reviews
#2,290
of 10,601 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#24,419
of 264,663 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Cochrane database of systematic reviews
#83
of 249 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,459,952 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 94th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 10,601 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 20.8. This one has done well, scoring higher than 78% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 264,663 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 249 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 66% of its contemporaries.