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Anxiety and depression in working-age cancer survivors: a register-based study

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Cancer, May 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#20 of 5,544)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (96th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
10 news outlets
twitter
4 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
10 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
43 Mendeley
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Title
Anxiety and depression in working-age cancer survivors: a register-based study
Published in
BMC Cancer, May 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12885-017-3347-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Laura Inhestern, Volker Beierlein, Johanna Christine Bultmann, Birgit Möller, Georg Romer, Uwe Koch, Corinna Bergelt

Abstract

Anxiety and depression can be a long-term strain in cancer survivors. Little is known about the emotional situation of cancer survivors who have to deal with work- and family-related issues. The purpose of this study was to investigate anxiety and depression in working-age cancer survivors and associated factors. A register-based sample of 3370 cancer survivors (25 to 55 years at time of diagnosis) diagnosed up to six years prior to the survey was recruited from two German cancer registries. Demographic and medical characteristics as well as self-reported measures were used. Overall, approximately 40% of the survivors reported moderate to high anxiety scores and approximately 20% reported moderate to high depression scores. Compared to the general population, working-age cancer survivors were more anxious but less depressed (p < .001). Subgroups with regard to time since diagnosis did not differ in anxiety or depression. Anxiety and depression in cancer survivors were associated with various variables. Better social support, family functioning and physical health were associated with lower anxiety and depression. Overall, we found higher anxiety levels in cancer survivors of working-age than in the general population. A considerable portion of cancer survivors reported moderate to high levels of anxiety and depression. The results indicate the need for psychosocial screening and psycho-oncological support e.g. in survivorship programs for working-age cancer survivors. Assessing the physical health, social support and family background might help to identify survivors at risk for higher emotional distress.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 43 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 43 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 9 21%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 12%
Student > Postgraduate 4 9%
Researcher 4 9%
Student > Bachelor 3 7%
Other 7 16%
Unknown 11 26%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 14 33%
Psychology 8 19%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 5%
Social Sciences 2 5%
Computer Science 1 2%
Other 3 7%
Unknown 13 30%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 87. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 January 2020.
All research outputs
#219,829
of 14,589,808 outputs
Outputs from BMC Cancer
#20
of 5,544 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#8,025
of 266,294 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Cancer
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,589,808 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,544 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.0. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 266,294 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them