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No Evidence of Dehydration with Moderate Daily Coffee Intake: A Counterbalanced Cross-Over Study in a Free-Living Population

Overview of attention for article published in PLOS ONE, January 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#31 of 181,164)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Citations

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Readers on

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284 Mendeley
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1 CiteULike
Title
No Evidence of Dehydration with Moderate Daily Coffee Intake: A Counterbalanced Cross-Over Study in a Free-Living Population
Published in
PLOS ONE, January 2014
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0084154
Pubmed ID
Authors

Sophie C. Killer, Andrew K. Blannin, Asker E. Jeukendrup

Abstract

It is often suggested that coffee causes dehydration and its consumption should be avoided or significantly reduced to maintain fluid balance. The aim of this study was to directly compare the effects of coffee consumption against water ingestion across a range of validated hydration assessment techniques. In a counterbalanced cross-over design, 50 male coffee drinkers (habitually consuming 3-6 cups per day) participated in two trials, each lasting three consecutive days. In addition to controlled physical activity, food and fluid intake, participants consumed either 4×200 mL of coffee containing 4 mg/kg caffeine (C) or water (W). Total body water (TBW) was calculated pre- and post-trial via ingestion of Deuterium Oxide. Urinary and haematological hydration markers were recorded daily in addition to nude body mass measurement (BM). Plasma was analysed for caffeine to confirm compliance. There were no significant changes in TBW from beginning to end of either trial and no differences between trials (51.5±1.4 vs. 51.4±1.3 kg, for C and W, respectively). No differences were observed between trials across any haematological markers or in 24 h urine volume (2409±660 vs. 2428±669 mL, for C and W, respectively), USG, osmolality or creatinine. Mean urinary Na(+) excretion was higher in C than W (p = 0.02). No significant differences in BM were found between conditions, although a small progressive daily fall was observed within both trials (0.4±0.5 kg; p<0.05). Our data show that there were no significant differences across a wide range of haematological and urinary markers of hydration status between trials. These data suggest that coffee, when consumed in moderation by caffeine habituated males provides similar hydrating qualities to water.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2,602 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 284 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 6 2%
Austria 2 <1%
Brazil 2 <1%
Portugal 1 <1%
Australia 1 <1%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Italy 1 <1%
New Zealand 1 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
Other 2 <1%
Unknown 266 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 64 23%
Student > Bachelor 63 22%
Researcher 27 10%
Student > Ph. D. Student 23 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 21 7%
Other 51 18%
Unknown 35 12%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 66 23%
Sports and Recreations 44 15%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 41 14%
Nursing and Health Professions 26 9%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 15 5%
Other 48 17%
Unknown 44 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2075. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 May 2022.
All research outputs
#3,130
of 21,242,513 outputs
Outputs from PLOS ONE
#31
of 181,164 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#23
of 303,718 outputs
Outputs of similar age from PLOS ONE
#3
of 7,836 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,242,513 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 181,164 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 14.6. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 303,718 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 7,836 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.