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Control of malaria and other vector-borne protozoan diseases in the tropics: enduring challenges despite considerable progress and achievements

Overview of attention for article published in Infectious Diseases of Poverty, January 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (80th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (81st percentile)

Mentioned by

policy
1 policy source
twitter
4 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
52 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
70 Mendeley
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Title
Control of malaria and other vector-borne protozoan diseases in the tropics: enduring challenges despite considerable progress and achievements
Published in
Infectious Diseases of Poverty, January 2014
DOI 10.1186/2049-9957-3-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Denis Zofou, Raymond B Nyasa, Dickson S Nsagha, Fidele Ntie-Kang, Henry D Meriki, Jules Clement N Assob, Victor Kuete

Abstract

Vector-borne protozoan diseases represent a serious public health challenge, especially in the tropics where poverty together with vector-favorable climates are the aggravating factors. Each of the various strategies currently employed to face these scourges is seriously inadequate. Despite enormous efforts, vaccines-which represent the ideal weapon against these parasitic diseases-are yet to be sufficiently developed and implemented. Chemotherapy and vector control are therefore the sole effective attempts to minimize the disease burden. Nowadays, both strategies are also highly challenged by the phenomenon of drug and insecticide resistance, which affects virtually all interventions currently used. The recently growing support from international organizations and governments of some endemic countries is warmly welcome, and should be optimally exploited in the various approaches to drug and insecticide research and development to overcome the burden of these prevalent diseases, especially malaria, leishmaniasis, Human African Trypanosomiasis (HAT), and Chagas disease.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 70 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 2 3%
Indonesia 1 1%
Bangladesh 1 1%
Portugal 1 1%
United States 1 1%
Unknown 64 91%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 15 21%
Student > Master 13 19%
Researcher 11 16%
Student > Bachelor 9 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 6%
Other 14 20%
Unknown 4 6%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 24 34%
Medicine and Dentistry 15 21%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 7%
Immunology and Microbiology 4 6%
Chemistry 4 6%
Other 13 19%
Unknown 5 7%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 September 2015.
All research outputs
#1,472,073
of 7,808,273 outputs
Outputs from Infectious Diseases of Poverty
#70
of 279 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#35,389
of 186,098 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Infectious Diseases of Poverty
#2
of 11 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,808,273 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 80th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 279 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.1. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 74% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 186,098 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 80% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 11 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 81% of its contemporaries.