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Circadian rhythms synchronize mitosis in Neurospora crassa

Overview of attention for article published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, January 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (90th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (64th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
twitter
4 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
26 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
77 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
Title
Circadian rhythms synchronize mitosis in Neurospora crassa
Published in
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, January 2014
DOI 10.1073/pnas.1319399111
Pubmed ID
Authors

Christian I. Hong, Judit Zámborszky, Mokryun Baek, Laszlo Labiscsak, Kyungsu Ju, Hyeyeong Lee, Luis F. Larrondo, Alejandra Goity, Hin Siong Chong, William J. Belden, Attila Csikász-Nagy

Abstract

The cell cycle and the circadian clock communicate with each other, resulting in circadian-gated cell division cycles. Alterations in this network may lead to diseases such as cancer. Therefore, it is critical to identify molecular components that connect these two oscillators. However, molecular mechanisms between the clock and the cell cycle remain largely unknown. A model filamentous fungus, Neurospora crassa, is a multinucleate system used to elucidate molecular mechanisms of circadian rhythms, but not used to investigate the molecular coupling between these two oscillators. In this report, we show that a conserved coupling between the circadian clock and the cell cycle exists via serine/threonine protein kinase-29 (STK-29), the Neurospora homolog of mammalian WEE1 kinase. Based on this finding, we established a mathematical model that predicts circadian oscillations of cell cycle components and circadian clock-dependent synchronized nuclear divisions. We experimentally demonstrate that G1 and G2 cyclins, CLN-1 and CLB-1, respectively, oscillate in a circadian manner with bioluminescence reporters. The oscillations of clb-1 and stk-29 gene expression are abolished in a circadian arrhythmic frq(ko) mutant. Additionally, we show the light-induced phase shifts of a core circadian component, frq, as well as the gene expression of the cell cycle components clb-1 and stk-29, which may alter the timing of divisions. We then used a histone hH1-GFP reporter to observe nuclear divisions over time, and show that a large number of nuclear divisions occur in the evening. Our findings demonstrate the circadian clock-dependent molecular dynamics of cell cycle components that result in synchronized nuclear divisions in Neurospora.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 77 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 3 4%
Germany 2 3%
Chile 1 1%
Portugal 1 1%
Australia 1 1%
Italy 1 1%
Switzerland 1 1%
Czech Republic 1 1%
Unknown 66 86%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 23 30%
Student > Ph. D. Student 20 26%
Student > Bachelor 8 10%
Student > Master 8 10%
Professor > Associate Professor 5 6%
Other 13 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 50 65%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 12 16%
Unspecified 4 5%
Chemistry 3 4%
Mathematics 2 3%
Other 6 8%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 13. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 September 2014.
All research outputs
#495,191
of 6,574,878 outputs
Outputs from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#9,751
of 40,644 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#15,440
of 157,682 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#318
of 907 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 6,574,878 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 92nd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 40,644 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 21.5. This one has done well, scoring higher than 75% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 157,682 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 907 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 64% of its contemporaries.