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HIV and AIDS-related knowledge among women in Iraq

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Research Notes, January 2008
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (69th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (66th percentile)

Mentioned by

policy
1 policy source

Citations

dimensions_citation
4 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
14 Mendeley
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Title
HIV and AIDS-related knowledge among women in Iraq
Published in
BMC Research Notes, January 2008
DOI 10.1186/1756-0500-1-123
Pubmed ID
Authors

Seter Siziya, Adamson S Muula, Emmanuel Rudatsikira

Abstract

Individuals who are aware of the risk of infection and perceive themselves to be at risk of infection are more likely to take action to prevent HIV infection. The aim of this study was to assess the knowledge of HIV/AIDS among Iraqi women. A secondary analysis of the 2000 Multiple Cluster Indicator Survey (MICS) for Iraq was carried out to assess the extent of HIV/AIDS-related knowledge among Iraqi women. The majority of the 22,997 respondents were age 15-24 years (44.3%), currently married (51.4%), and resided in urban areas (71.7%). About 1 in 4 (26.0%) of the study participants had no formal education. Only 49.9% had heard of HIV/AIDS. Overall, 60.5% did not know that HIV can be transmitted through blood transfusion. Meanwhile, 98.5% of the respondents did not know that HIV can be transmitted from mother to child through breast milk. Only 0.7% of the respondents reported that HIV cannot be transmitted through mosquito bites. The proportion of the respondents who had adequate knowledge on HIV/AIDS was 9.8%. Adequate knowledge of HIV/AIDS was negatively associated with being married, poor, having low education, and residing in rural areas. Findings from this study indicate that adequate knowledge of HIV/AIDS among Iraqi is very limited and associated with marital status, education, wealth, and place of residence. This information may be of use in the design, targeting, monitoring and evaluation of programs aimed at improving HIV and AIDS related knowledge in Iraq.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 14 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Nigeria 1 7%
United States 1 7%
Unknown 12 86%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 3 21%
Student > Master 3 21%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 21%
Researcher 2 14%
Student > Postgraduate 1 7%
Other 2 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 6 43%
Social Sciences 5 36%
Mathematics 1 7%
Unspecified 1 7%
Philosophy 1 7%
Other 0 0%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 January 2012.
All research outputs
#1,900,985
of 7,772,166 outputs
Outputs from BMC Research Notes
#480
of 1,917 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#29,284
of 99,459 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Research Notes
#2
of 9 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,772,166 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 62nd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,917 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.5. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 71% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 99,459 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 69% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 9 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 7 of them.