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Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis-related liver cirrhosis is increasing in China: A ten-year retrospective study

Overview of attention for article published in Clinics, August 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (59th percentile)

Mentioned by

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1 policy source

Citations

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13 Dimensions

Readers on

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30 Mendeley
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Title
Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis-related liver cirrhosis is increasing in China: A ten-year retrospective study
Published in
Clinics, August 2015
DOI 10.6061/clinics/2015(08)06
Pubmed ID
Authors

J Xiong, J Wang, J Huang, W Sun, J Wang, D Chen

Abstract

Little is known about metabolic factors in cirrhotic patients in China. Therefore, we aimed to quantify the prevalence of both metabolic factors and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis-related liver cirrhosis in China. The medical records of 1,582 patients diagnosed with liver cirrhosis from June 2003 to July 2013 at Daping Hospital (Chongqing, China) were retrospectively reviewed through a computer-generated search. Serum hepatitis B virus surface antigen was present in 1,083 (68.5%) patients, and hepatitis B was found to be the only etiological factor in 938 (59.3%) of all patients. Obesity, diabetes mellitus, and arterial hypertension were observed in 229 (14.5%), 159 (10.1%), and 129 (8.2%) patients, respectively. From 2012-2013, the proportion of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis-related liver cirrhosis increased to 3.2%, whereas the average proportion of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis-related liver cirrhosis in the previous ten years was 1.9%. The incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma was much higher in males than in females (6.3% vs. 3.7%, respectively, p=0.036). Obesity and diabetes mellitus did not significantly increase the incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma in the whole cirrhotic group. The presence of hepatitis B virus was the only risk factor for hepatocellular carcinoma in cirrhotic patients (p<0.001). Although hepatitis B virus remains the main etiology of liver cirrhosis in China, steatohepatitis-related liver cirrhosis is increasing in frequency. Hepatitis B virus was the sole significant risk factor for hepatocellular carcinoma in the whole cirrhotic group in the present study, in contrast to obesity and diabetes mellitus, for which only a trend of increased hepatocellular carcinoma was found.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 30 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Brazil 1 3%
Unknown 29 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 6 20%
Student > Master 6 20%
Student > Postgraduate 4 13%
Other 3 10%
Researcher 3 10%
Other 4 13%
Unknown 4 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 12 40%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 10%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 2 7%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 7%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 3%
Other 2 7%
Unknown 8 27%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 July 2016.
All research outputs
#5,609,310
of 17,364,317 outputs
Outputs from Clinics
#155
of 533 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#101,762
of 276,873 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Clinics
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,364,317 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 533 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.3. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 53% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 276,873 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 59% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them