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Genetic assessment of the effects of streamscape succession on coho salmon Oncorhynchus kisutch colonization in recently deglaciated streams

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Fish Biology, May 2017
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2 tweeters
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1 Facebook page

Citations

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6 Dimensions

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20 Mendeley
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Title
Genetic assessment of the effects of streamscape succession on coho salmon Oncorhynchus kisutch colonization in recently deglaciated streams
Published in
Journal of Fish Biology, May 2017
DOI 10.1111/jfb.13337
Pubmed ID
Authors

K. T. Scribner, C. Soiseth, J. McGuire, G. K. Sage, L. Thorsteinson, J. L. Nielsen, E. Knudsen

Abstract

Measures of genetic diversity within and among populations and historical geomorphological data on stream landscapes were used in model simulations based on approximate Bayesian computation (ABC) to examine hypotheses of the relative importance of stream features (geomorphology and age) associated with colonization events and gene flow for coho salmon Oncorhynchus kisutch breeding in recently deglaciated streams (50-240 years b.p.) in Glacier Bay National Park (GBNP), Alaska. Population estimates of genetic diversity including heterozygosity and allelic richness declined significantly and monotonically from the oldest and largest to youngest and smallest GBNP streams. Interpopulation variance in allele frequency increased with increasing distance between streams (r = 0·435, P < 0·01) and was inversely related to stream age (r = -0·281, P < 0·01). The most supported model of colonization involved ongoing or recent (<10 generations before sampling) colonization originating from large populations outside Glacier Bay proper into all other GBNP streams sampled. Results here show that sustained gene flow from large source populations is important to recently established O. kisutch metapopulations. Studies that document how genetic and demographic characteristics of newly founded populations vary associated with successional changes in stream habitat are of particular importance to and have significant implications for, restoration of declining or repatriation of extirpated populations in other regions of the species' native range.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 20 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 20 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 4 20%
Student > Master 4 20%
Professor 3 15%
Other 2 10%
Student > Bachelor 1 5%
Other 3 15%
Unknown 3 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 8 40%
Environmental Science 4 20%
Unspecified 1 5%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 5%
Arts and Humanities 1 5%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 5 25%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 25 May 2017.
All research outputs
#11,644,010
of 17,919,784 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Fish Biology
#2,816
of 3,946 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#164,688
of 278,359 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Fish Biology
#53
of 76 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,919,784 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,946 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.3. This one is in the 22nd percentile – i.e., 22% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 278,359 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 31st percentile – i.e., 31% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 76 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.