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Landscape complexity influences route-memory formation in navigating pigeons

Overview of attention for article published in Biology Letters, January 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (91st percentile)

Mentioned by

news
12 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
twitter
8 tweeters
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page

Citations

dimensions_citation
16 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
53 Mendeley
citeulike
2 CiteULike
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Title
Landscape complexity influences route-memory formation in navigating pigeons
Published in
Biology Letters, January 2014
DOI 10.1098/rsbl.2013.0885
Pubmed ID
Authors

Richard P. Mann, Chris Armstrong, Jessica Meade, Robin Freeman, Dora Biro, Tim Guilford

Abstract

Observations of the flight paths of pigeons navigating from familiar locations have shown that these birds are able to learn and subsequently follow habitual routes home. It has been suggested that navigation along these routes is based on the recognition of memorized visual landmarks. Previous research has identified the effect of landmarks on flight path structure, and thus the locations of potentially salient sites. Pigeons have also been observed to be particularly attracted to strong linear features in the landscape, such as roads and rivers. However, a more general understanding of the specific characteristics of the landscape that facilitate route learning has remained out of reach. In this study, we identify landscape complexity as a key predictor of the fidelity to the habitual route, and thus conclude that pigeons form route memories most strongly in regions where the landscape complexity is neither too great nor too low. Our results imply that pigeons process their visual environment on a characteristic spatial scale while navigating and can explain the different degrees of success in reproducing route learning in different geographical locations.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 8 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 53 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Malaysia 1 2%
Israel 1 2%
United States 1 2%
Netherlands 1 2%
Unknown 49 92%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 15 28%
Researcher 7 13%
Professor > Associate Professor 7 13%
Student > Master 7 13%
Student > Postgraduate 5 9%
Other 10 19%
Unknown 2 4%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 30 57%
Environmental Science 5 9%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 6%
Physics and Astronomy 3 6%
Computer Science 2 4%
Other 7 13%
Unknown 3 6%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 117. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 November 2014.
All research outputs
#203,014
of 17,353,889 outputs
Outputs from Biology Letters
#276
of 2,868 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#2,659
of 262,895 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Biology Letters
#8
of 97 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,353,889 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,868 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 49.5. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 262,895 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 97 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its contemporaries.