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The 'extremely ancient' chromosome that isn't: a forensic bioinformatic investigation of Albert Perry's X-degenerate portion of the Y chromosome.

Overview of attention for article published in European Journal of Human Genetics, January 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#6 of 1,849)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (96th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
10 news outlets
blogs
5 blogs
twitter
42 tweeters
facebook
4 Facebook pages
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page

Readers on

mendeley
51 Mendeley
citeulike
2 CiteULike
Title
The 'extremely ancient' chromosome that isn't: a forensic bioinformatic investigation of Albert Perry's X-degenerate portion of the Y chromosome.
Published in
European Journal of Human Genetics, January 2014
DOI 10.1038/ejhg.2013.303
Pubmed ID
Authors

Eran Elhaik, Tatiana V Tatarinova, Anatole A Klyosov, Dan Graur, Elhaik E, Tatarinova TV, Klyosov AA, Graur D

Abstract

Mendez and colleagues reported the identification of a Y chromosome haplotype (the A00 lineage) that lies at the basal position of the Y chromosome phylogenetic tree. Incorporating this haplotype, the authors estimated the time to the most recent common ancestor (TMRCA) for the Y tree to be 338 000 years ago (95% CI=237 000-581 000). Such an extraordinarily early estimate contradicts all previous estimates in the literature and is over a 100 000 years older than the earliest fossils of anatomically modern humans. This estimate raises two astonishing possibilities, either the novel Y chromosome was inherited after ancestral humans interbred with another species, or anatomically modern Homo sapiens emerged earlier than previously estimated and quickly became subdivided into genetically differentiated subpopulations. We demonstrate that the TMRCA estimate was reached through inadequate statistical and analytical methods, each of which contributed to its inflation. We show that the authors ignored previously inferred Y-specific rates of substitution, incorrectly derived the Y-specific substitution rate from autosomal mutation rates, and compared unequal lengths of the novel Y chromosome with the previously recognized basal lineage. Our analysis indicates that the A00 lineage was derived from all the other lineages 208 300 (95% CI=163 900-260 200) years ago.European Journal of Human Genetics advance online publication, 22 January 2014; doi:10.1038/ejhg.2013.303.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 42 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 51 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 4%
United Kingdom 1 2%
Turkey 1 2%
Netherlands 1 2%
Unknown 46 90%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 17 33%
Researcher 10 20%
Student > Postgraduate 5 10%
Student > Bachelor 4 8%
Student > Master 4 8%
Other 11 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 29 57%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 12 24%
Arts and Humanities 2 4%
Social Sciences 2 4%
Environmental Science 1 2%
Other 5 10%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 156. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 October 2017.
All research outputs
#52,207
of 8,598,052 outputs
Outputs from European Journal of Human Genetics
#6
of 1,849 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#1,228
of 191,554 outputs
Outputs of similar age from European Journal of Human Genetics
#1
of 30 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,598,052 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,849 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.8. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 191,554 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 30 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.