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Ocean warming and acidification have complex interactive effects on the dynamics of a marine fungal disease

Overview of attention for article published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, March 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (93rd percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (63rd percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
blogs
1 blog
twitter
4 tweeters
f1000
1 research highlight platform

Citations

dimensions_citation
27 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
123 Mendeley
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Title
Ocean warming and acidification have complex interactive effects on the dynamics of a marine fungal disease
Published in
Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, March 2014
DOI 10.1098/rspb.2013.3069
Pubmed ID
Authors

Gareth J. Williams, Nichole N. Price, Blake Ushijima, Greta S. Aeby, Sean Callahan, Simon K. Davy, Jamison M. Gove, Maggie D. Johnson, Ingrid S. Knapp, Amanda Shore-Maggio, Jennifer E. Smith, Patrick Videau, Thierry M. Work

Abstract

Diseases threaten the structure and function of marine ecosystems and are contributing to the global decline of coral reefs. We currently lack an understanding of how climate change stressors, such as ocean acidification (OA) and warming, may simultaneously affect coral reef disease dynamics, particularly diseases threatening key reef-building organisms, for example crustose coralline algae (CCA). Here, we use coralline fungal disease (CFD), a previously described CCA disease from the Pacific, to examine these simultaneous effects using both field observations and experimental manipulations. We identify the associated fungus as belonging to the subphylum Ustilaginomycetes and show linear lesion expansion rates on individual hosts can reach 6.5 mm per day. Further, we demonstrate for the first time, to our knowledge, that ocean-warming events could increase the frequency of CFD outbreaks on coral reefs, but that OA-induced lowering of pH may ameliorate outbreaks by slowing lesion expansion rates on individual hosts. Lowered pH may still reduce overall host survivorship, however, by reducing calcification and facilitating fungal bio-erosion. Such complex, interactive effects between simultaneous extrinsic environmental stressors on disease dynamics are important to consider if we are to accurately predict the response of coral reef communities to future climate change.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 123 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 3 2%
France 2 2%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Norway 1 <1%
Germany 1 <1%
Sweden 1 <1%
Unknown 114 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 29 24%
Student > Ph. D. Student 20 16%
Student > Master 20 16%
Student > Bachelor 17 14%
Other 9 7%
Other 28 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 65 53%
Environmental Science 23 19%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 14 11%
Unspecified 10 8%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 3%
Other 7 6%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 19. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 July 2016.
All research outputs
#783,371
of 12,960,324 outputs
Outputs from Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
#2,283
of 7,298 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#15,667
of 240,497 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
#56
of 154 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,960,324 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 93rd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 7,298 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 28.1. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 68% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 240,497 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 154 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 63% of its contemporaries.