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Cenozoic Planktonic Marine Diatom Diversity and Correlation to Climate Change

Overview of attention for article published in PLoS ONE, January 2014
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (83rd percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (81st percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
8 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page
video
1 video uploader

Citations

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37 Dimensions

Readers on

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112 Mendeley
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Title
Cenozoic Planktonic Marine Diatom Diversity and Correlation to Climate Change
Published in
PLoS ONE, January 2014
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0084857
Pubmed ID
Authors

David Lazarus, John Barron, Johan Renaudie, Patrick Diver, Andreas Türke

Abstract

Marine planktonic diatoms export carbon to the deep ocean, playing a key role in the global carbon cycle. Although commonly thought to have diversified over the Cenozoic as global oceans cooled, only two conflicting quantitative reconstructions exist, both from the Neptune deep-sea microfossil occurrences database. Total diversity shows Cenozoic increase but is sample size biased; conventional subsampling shows little net change. We calculate diversity from a separately compiled new diatom species range catalog, and recalculate Neptune subsampled-in-bin diversity using new methods to correct for increasing Cenozoic geographic endemism and decreasing Cenozoic evenness. We find coherent, substantial Cenozoic diversification in both datasets. Many living cold water species, including species important for export productivity, originate only in the latest Miocene or younger. We make a first quantitative comparison of diatom diversity to the global Cenozoic benthic ∂(18)O (climate) and carbon cycle records (∂(13)C, and 20-0 Ma pCO2). Warmer climates are strongly correlated with lower diatom diversity (raw: rho = .92, p<.001; detrended, r = .6, p = .01). Diatoms were 20% less diverse in the early late Miocene, when temperatures and pCO2 were only moderately higher than today. Diversity is strongly correlated to both ∂(13)C and pCO2 over the last 15 my (for both: r>.9, detrended r>.6, all p<.001), but only weakly over the earlier Cenozoic, suggesting increasingly strong linkage of diatom and climate evolution in the Neogene. Our results suggest that many living marine planktonic diatom species may be at risk of extinction in future warm oceans, with an unknown but potentially substantial negative impact on the ocean biologic pump and oceanic carbon sequestration. We cannot however extrapolate our my-scale correlations with generic climate proxies to anthropogenic time-scales of warming without additional species-specific information on proximate ecologic controls.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 8 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 112 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 5 4%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Germany 1 <1%
Iceland 1 <1%
Mexico 1 <1%
India 1 <1%
Argentina 1 <1%
Unknown 101 90%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 30 27%
Researcher 23 21%
Student > Master 16 14%
Student > Bachelor 12 11%
Unspecified 11 10%
Other 20 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Earth and Planetary Sciences 50 45%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 27 24%
Unspecified 16 14%
Environmental Science 9 8%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 3%
Other 7 6%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 7. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 December 2018.
All research outputs
#2,089,475
of 13,093,005 outputs
Outputs from PLoS ONE
#31,198
of 140,882 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#38,454
of 240,720 outputs
Outputs of similar age from PLoS ONE
#1,471
of 8,191 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,093,005 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 83rd percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 140,882 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 12.0. This one has done well, scoring higher than 77% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 240,720 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 83% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 8,191 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 81% of its contemporaries.