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A diagnostic protocol designed for determining allergic causes in patients with blood eosinophilia

Overview of attention for article published in Military Medical Research, May 2017
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Title
A diagnostic protocol designed for determining allergic causes in patients with blood eosinophilia
Published in
Military Medical Research, May 2017
DOI 10.1186/s40779-017-0124-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jean-François Magnaval, Guy Laurent, Noémie Gaudré, Judith Fillaux, Antoine Berry

Abstract

Blood eosinophilia is a common laboratory abnormality, and its characterization frequently represents a quandary for primary care physicians. Consequently, in France, specialists and particularly hematologists, often must investigate patients who present with blood eosinophilia that often, but not always, occurs because of allergic causes. Both the Departments of Hematology and Parasitology at Toulouse University Hospitals established a collaboration to rule out allergic causes of eosinophilia, particularly helminthiases, prior to initiating more sophisticated investigations. Since 2004, the authors employed the same protocol to investigate eosinophilic outpatients who attended the clinic of Parasitology at Toulouse University Hospitals, and they reported the performance of this diagnostic procedure that was designed to be rapid (no hospitalization required) and only moderately expensive. A total of 406 patients who presented with blood eosinophilia greater than 0.5 (×10(9), giga cells per litter, G/L) had an allergic etiology in 350 (86.2%) cases. Among the remaining 56 subjects, 17 did not undergo a follow-up and 39 were referred to another specialized department, mostly Hematology. However, only 21 patients attended then were subsequently investigated. Non-allergic causes of eosinophilia, including 3 cases of the lymphoid variant of hypereosinophilic syndrome and 2 cases of myeloproliferative disorder, were identified in 14 patients, whereas 7 remained diagnosed as having idiopathic eosinophilia. This study underlines the need to investigate patients presenting with even moderate blood eosinophilia. The work-up that was employed appears to be efficient and versatile and may be used by any medical specialist, such as in hematology, infectious disease, or internal medicine departments, who needs to investigate eosinophilic patients and should initially rule out any etiology of allergic eosinophilia.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 18 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 18 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 5 28%
Student > Bachelor 4 22%
Other 3 17%
Professor 2 11%
Unspecified 1 6%
Other 3 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 10 56%
Immunology and Microbiology 2 11%
Computer Science 1 6%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 6%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 6%
Other 2 11%
Unknown 1 6%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 June 2017.
All research outputs
#6,774,133
of 11,332,694 outputs
Outputs from Military Medical Research
#42
of 88 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#137,847
of 266,214 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Military Medical Research
#5
of 7 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,332,694 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 88 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.8. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 266,214 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 7 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 2 of them.