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The effect of food insecurity on health status of adolescents in Ethiopia: longitudinal study

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, May 2017
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2 tweeters

Citations

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7 Dimensions

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83 Mendeley
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Title
The effect of food insecurity on health status of adolescents in Ethiopia: longitudinal study
Published in
BMC Public Health, May 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12889-017-4406-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Mulusew G. Jebena, David Lindstrom, Carl Lachat, Tefera Belachew, Patrick Kolsteren

Abstract

The effect of food insecurity on health and wellbeing of a population has been the subject of much research. Yet, limited research has investigated its effect on adolescents' health and wellbeing in Ethiopia. We used data from the Jimma Longitudinal Family Survey of Youth which began tracking a cohort of adolescents in 2005 to examine the social, behavioral and economic determinants of their health and well-being. A total of 1,919 sample were included in the main analyses. All youths provided data related to their food insecurity experiences and their health status. A mixed effect logistic regression using random intercept and trend model was used to examine the relationship between food insecurity and their health status. Fixed effects estimates were also computed to check the parsimoniousness of the random intercept and trend model. The results indicated that the mean (±SD) age of adolescents was 18.6(±1.4). Nine hundred twenty three (48.1%) of them were female. The magnitude of self-rated health status was relatively unstable ranging from 18.9%, 34.7% to 37.3% in each round. Similarly, 20.4%, 48.4% and 20.6% of adolescents were food insecure during each consecutive round of the survey respectively. Exposure to food insecurity is strongly associated with self-rated health status (β = 0.28, P < 0.001) and poor self-rated health was also more pronounced for some time (β =2.11, P < 0.001) and decline after a turning point (β = -0.38, P < 0.001). These findings imply that any social, nutrition and public health interventions designed to improve adolescent health should consider underlying social determinants of health such as food insecurity.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 83 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 83 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 12 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 12%
Student > Master 10 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 7 8%
Student > Postgraduate 4 5%
Other 13 16%
Unknown 27 33%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 13 16%
Medicine and Dentistry 10 12%
Social Sciences 9 11%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 6 7%
Psychology 4 5%
Other 10 12%
Unknown 31 37%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 November 2017.
All research outputs
#7,295,417
of 12,154,160 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#5,845
of 8,222 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#140,525
of 270,518 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#157
of 208 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,154,160 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 8,222 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.6. This one is in the 25th percentile – i.e., 25% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 270,518 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 208 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.