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Intrastriatal injection of α-synuclein can lead to widespread synucleinopathy independent of neuroanatomic connectivity

Overview of attention for article published in Molecular Neurodegeneration, May 2017
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Title
Intrastriatal injection of α-synuclein can lead to widespread synucleinopathy independent of neuroanatomic connectivity
Published in
Molecular Neurodegeneration, May 2017
DOI 10.1186/s13024-017-0182-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Zachary A. Sorrentino, Mieu M.T. Brooks, Vincent Hudson, Nicola J. Rutherford, Todd E. Golde, Benoit I. Giasson, Paramita Chakrabarty

Abstract

Prionoid transmission of α-synuclein (αSyn) aggregates along neuroanatomically connected projections is posited to underlie disease progression in α-synucleinopathies. Here, we specifically wanted to study whether this prionoid progression occurs via direct inter-neuronal transfer and, if so, would intrastriatal injection of αSyn aggregates lead to nigral degeneration. To test prionoid transmission of αSyn aggregates along the nigro-striatal pathway, we injected amyloidogenic αSyn aggregates into two different regions of the striatum of adult human wild type αSyn transgenic mice (Line M20) or non-transgenic (NTG) mice and aged for 4 months. M20 mice injected in internal capsule (IC) or caudate putamen (CPu) regions of the striatum showed florid αSyn inclusion pathology distributed throughout the neuraxis, irrespective of anatomic connectivity. These αSyn inclusions were found in different cell types including neurons, astrocytes and even ependymal cells. On the other hand, intra-striatal injection of αSyn fibrils into NTG mice resulted in sparse αSyn pathology, mostly localized in the striatum and entorhinal cortex. Interestingly, NTG mice injected with preformed human αSyn fibrils showed no induction of αSyn inclusion pathology, suggesting the presence of a species barrier for αSyn fibrillar seeds. Modest levels of nigral dopaminergic (DA) neuronal loss was observed exclusively in substantia nigra (SN) of M20 cohorts injected in the IC, even in the absence of frank αSyn inclusions in DA neurons. None of the NTG mice or CPu-injected M20 mice showed DA neurodegeneration. Interestingly, the pattern and distribution of induced αSyn pathology corresponded with neuroinflammation especially in the SN of M20 cohorts. Hypermorphic reactive astrocytes laden with αSyn inclusions were abundantly present in the brains of M20 mice. Overall, our findings show that the pattern and extent of dissemination of αSyn pathology does not necessarily follow expected neuroanatomic connectivity. Further, the presence of intra-astrocytic αSyn pathology implies that glial cells participate in αSyn transmission and possibly have a role in non-cell autonomous disease modification.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 58 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 3%
Unknown 56 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 16 28%
Student > Ph. D. Student 16 28%
Student > Master 9 16%
Student > Bachelor 6 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 7%
Other 5 9%
Unknown 2 3%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Neuroscience 22 38%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 11 19%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 10 17%
Medicine and Dentistry 7 12%
Business, Management and Accounting 1 2%
Other 3 5%
Unknown 4 7%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 30 May 2017.
All research outputs
#6,625,600
of 11,174,763 outputs
Outputs from Molecular Neurodegeneration
#353
of 492 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#137,602
of 265,745 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Molecular Neurodegeneration
#24
of 25 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,174,763 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 38th percentile – i.e., 38% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 492 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.0. This one is in the 25th percentile – i.e., 25% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 265,745 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 25 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 4th percentile – i.e., 4% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.