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Family involvement in timely detection of changes in health of nursing homes residents: a qualitative exploratory study

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Clinical Nursing, May 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#49 of 2,820)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (93rd percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (97th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
4 news outlets
twitter
10 tweeters

Readers on

mendeley
2 Mendeley
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Title
Family involvement in timely detection of changes in health of nursing homes residents: a qualitative exploratory study
Published in
Journal of Clinical Nursing, May 2017
DOI 10.1111/jocn.13906
Pubmed ID
Authors

Powell, Catherine, Blighe, Alan, Froggatt, Katherine, McCormack, Brendan, Woodward‐Carlton, Barbara, Young, John, Robinson, Louise, Downs, Murna, Catherine Powell, Alan Blighe, Katherine Froggatt, Brendan McCormack, Barbara Woodward-Carlton, John Young, Louise Robinson, Murna Downs

Abstract

To explore family perspectives on their involvement in the timely detection of changes in their relatives' health in UK nursing homes. Increasingly, policy attention is being paid to the need to reduce hospitalisations for conditions that, if detected and treated in time, could be managed in the community. We know that family continue to be involved in the care of their family members once they have moved into a nursing home. Little is known, however, about family involvement in the timely detection of changes in health in nursing home residents. Qualitative exploratory study with thematic analysis. A purposive sampling strategy was applied. 14 semi-structured one-to-one telephone interviews with family members of people living in 13 different UK nursing homes. Data were collected from November 2015 to March 2016. Families were involved in the timely detection of changes in health in three key ways: noticing signs of changes in health, informing care staff about what they noticed, and educating care staff about their family members' changes in health. Families suggested they could be supported to detect timely changes in health by developing effective working practices with care staff. Families can provide a special contribution to the process of timely detection in nursing homes. Their involvement needs to be negotiated, better supported, as well as given more legitimacy and structure within the nursing home. Families could provide much needed support to nursing home nurses, care assistants, and managers in timely detection of changes in health. This may be achieved through communication about their preferred involvement on a case-by-case basis as well as providing appropriate support or services. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 10 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 2 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 2 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 1 50%
Unknown 1 50%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 1 50%
Unknown 1 50%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 37. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 January 2018.
All research outputs
#308,410
of 9,656,318 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Clinical Nursing
#49
of 2,820 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#16,333
of 263,300 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Clinical Nursing
#2
of 98 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 9,656,318 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 96th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,820 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.1. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 263,300 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 98 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.