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Increased nitrous oxide emissions from Arctic peatlands after permafrost thaw

Overview of attention for article published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, May 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (98th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
78 news outlets
blogs
4 blogs
policy
1 policy source
twitter
60 tweeters
facebook
4 Facebook pages
googleplus
1 Google+ user
reddit
1 Redditor

Citations

dimensions_citation
28 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
126 Mendeley
Title
Increased nitrous oxide emissions from Arctic peatlands after permafrost thaw
Published in
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, May 2017
DOI 10.1073/pnas.1702902114
Pubmed ID
Authors

Carolina Voigt, Maija E. Marushchak, Richard E. Lamprecht, Marcin Jackowicz-Korczyński, Amelie Lindgren, Mikhail Mastepanov, Lars Granlund, Torben R. Christensen, Teemu Tahvanainen, Pertti J. Martikainen, Christina Biasi

Abstract

Permafrost in the Arctic is thawing, exposing large carbon and nitrogen stocks for decomposition. Gaseous carbon release from Arctic soils due to permafrost thawing is known to be substantial, but growing evidence suggests that Arctic soils may also be relevant sources of nitrous oxide (N2O). Here we show that N2O emissions from subarctic peatlands increase as the permafrost thaws. In our study, the highest postthaw emissions occurred from bare peat surfaces, a typical landform in permafrost peatlands, where permafrost thaw caused a fivefold increase in emissions (0.56 ± 0.11 vs. 2.81 ± 0.6 mg N2O m(-2) d(-1)). These emission rates match those from tropical forest soils, the world's largest natural terrestrial N2O source. The presence of vegetation, known to limit N2O emissions in tundra, did decrease (by ∼90%) but did not prevent thaw-induced N2O release, whereas waterlogged conditions suppressed the emissions. We show that regions with high probability for N2O emissions cover one-fourth of the Arctic. Our results imply that the Arctic N2O budget will depend strongly on moisture changes, and that a gradual deepening of the active layer will create a strong noncarbon climate change feedback.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 60 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 126 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 3 2%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Unknown 122 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 35 28%
Student > Ph. D. Student 33 26%
Student > Master 13 10%
Student > Bachelor 8 6%
Professor 6 5%
Other 15 12%
Unknown 16 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 45 36%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 25 20%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 24 19%
Unspecified 3 2%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 2%
Other 4 3%
Unknown 23 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 696. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 November 2019.
All research outputs
#9,290
of 14,124,762 outputs
Outputs from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#347
of 81,829 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#411
of 268,825 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#17
of 912 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,124,762 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 81,829 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 25.3. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 268,825 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 912 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.