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A long-term copper exposure in a freshwater ecosystem using lotic mesocosms: Invertebrate community responses

Overview of attention for article published in Environmental Toxicology & Chemistry, May 2017
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (57th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (70th percentile)

Mentioned by

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5 tweeters

Citations

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4 Dimensions

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37 Mendeley
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Title
A long-term copper exposure in a freshwater ecosystem using lotic mesocosms: Invertebrate community responses
Published in
Environmental Toxicology & Chemistry, May 2017
DOI 10.1002/etc.3822
Pubmed ID
Authors

Sandrine Joachim, Hélène Roussel, Jean-Marc Bonzom, Eric Thybaud, Christopher A. Mebane, Paul Van den Brink, Laury Gauthier

Abstract

A lotic mesocosm study was carried out in 20-m-long channels, under continuous, environmentally realistic concentrations of copper (Cu) in low, medium, and high exposures (nominally 0, 5, 25, and 75 μg L(-1) ; average effective concentrations <0.5, 4, 20, and 57 μg L(-1) respectively) for 18 mo. Total abundance, taxa richness, and community structure of zooplankton, macroinvertebrates, and emerging insects were severely affected at Cu treatment levels of 25 and 75 μg L(-1) . Some taxa were sensitive to Cu, including gastropods such as Lymnaea spp. and Physa sp., crustaceans such as Chydorus sphaericus, Gammarus pulex, and Asellus aquaticus, rotifers such as Mytilina sp. and Trichocerca sp., leeches such as Erpobdella sp., and the emergence of dipteran insects such as Chironomini. Other taxa appeared to be tolerant or favored by indirect effects, as in Chironimidae larvae, the emergence of Orthocladiinae, and the zooplankter Vorticella sp., which increased in the 25 and 75 μg L(-1) treatments. After approximately 8 mo of Cu exposure, the macroinvertebrate community in the high treatment was decimated to the point that few organisms could be detected, with moderate effects in the medium treatment, and very slight effects in the low-Cu treatment. Subsequently, most taxa in the high-Cu exposure began a gradual and partial recovery. By the end of the study at 18 mo, macroinvertebrate taxa richness was similar to control richness, although overall abundances remained lower than controls. After 18 mo of copper exposure, a no-observed-effect concentration at the community level for consumers was set at 5 μg L(-1) (4 μg L(-1) as average effective concentration), and a lowest-observed-effect concentration at 25 μg L(-1) (20 μg L(-1) as average effective concentration). Environ Toxicol Chem 2017;9999:1-17. © 2017 SETAC.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 37 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 37 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 24%
Student > Doctoral Student 7 19%
Student > Master 4 11%
Researcher 4 11%
Student > Bachelor 3 8%
Other 7 19%
Unknown 3 8%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 16 43%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 9 24%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 3 8%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 8%
Unspecified 1 3%
Other 1 3%
Unknown 4 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 March 2018.
All research outputs
#7,180,646
of 13,560,184 outputs
Outputs from Environmental Toxicology & Chemistry
#2,259
of 3,915 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#111,292
of 269,031 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Environmental Toxicology & Chemistry
#30
of 100 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,560,184 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,915 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.5. This one is in the 41st percentile – i.e., 41% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 269,031 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 57% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 100 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 70% of its contemporaries.