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Standardized phenology monitoring methods to track plant and animal activity for science and resource management applications

Overview of attention for article published in International Journal of Biometeorology, January 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (89th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (71st percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
6 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
57 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
141 Mendeley
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Title
Standardized phenology monitoring methods to track plant and animal activity for science and resource management applications
Published in
International Journal of Biometeorology, January 2014
DOI 10.1007/s00484-014-0789-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ellen G. Denny, Katharine L. Gerst, Abraham J. Miller-Rushing, Geraldine L. Tierney, Theresa M. Crimmins, Carolyn A. F. Enquist, Patricia Guertin, Alyssa H. Rosemartin, Mark D. Schwartz, Kathryn A. Thomas, Jake F. Weltzin

Abstract

Phenology offers critical insights into the responses of species to climate change; shifts in species' phenologies can result in disruptions to the ecosystem processes and services upon which human livelihood depends. To better detect such shifts, scientists need long-term phenological records covering many taxa and across a broad geographic distribution. To date, phenological observation efforts across the USA have been geographically limited and have used different methods, making comparisons across sites and species difficult. To facilitate coordinated cross-site, cross-species, and geographically extensive phenological monitoring across the nation, the USA National Phenology Network has developed in situ monitoring protocols standardized across taxonomic groups and ecosystem types for terrestrial, freshwater, and marine plant and animal taxa. The protocols include elements that allow enhanced detection and description of phenological responses, including assessment of phenological "status", or the ability to track presence-absence of a particular phenophase, as well as standards for documenting the degree to which phenological activity is expressed in terms of intensity or abundance. Data collected by this method can be integrated with historical phenology data sets, enabling the development of databases for spatial and temporal assessment of changes in status and trends of disparate organisms. To build a common, spatially, and temporally extensive multi-taxa phenological data set available for a variety of research and science applications, we encourage scientists, resources managers, and others conducting ecological monitoring or research to consider utilization of these standardized protocols for tracking the seasonal activity of plants and animals.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 141 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Brazil 2 1%
United States 2 1%
Spain 1 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
Unknown 135 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 35 25%
Student > Ph. D. Student 26 18%
Student > Master 23 16%
Unspecified 14 10%
Student > Bachelor 9 6%
Other 34 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 62 44%
Environmental Science 37 26%
Unspecified 21 15%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 13 9%
Social Sciences 2 1%
Other 6 4%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 11. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 November 2018.
All research outputs
#1,339,564
of 12,980,533 outputs
Outputs from International Journal of Biometeorology
#208
of 826 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#26,338
of 240,768 outputs
Outputs of similar age from International Journal of Biometeorology
#4
of 14 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,980,533 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 89th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 826 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.8. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 74% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 240,768 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 14 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 71% of its contemporaries.