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Genome-wide identification of markers for selecting higher oil content in oil palm

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Plant Biology, May 2017
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Citations

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65 Mendeley
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Title
Genome-wide identification of markers for selecting higher oil content in oil palm
Published in
BMC Plant Biology, May 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12870-017-1045-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Bin Bai, Le Wang, May Lee, Yingjun Zhang, Rahmadsyah, Yuzer Alfiko, Bao Qing Ye, Zi Yi Wan, Chin Huat Lim, Antonius Suwanto, Nam-Hai Chua, Gen Hua Yue

Abstract

Oil palm (Elaeis guineensis, Jacq.) is the most important source of edible oil. The improvement of oil yield is currently slow in conventional breeding programs due to long generation intervals. Marker-assisted selection (MAS) has the potential to accelerate genetic improvement. To identify DNA markers associated with oil content traits for MAS, we performed quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping using genotyping by sequencing (GBS) in a breeding population derived from a cross between Deli Dura and Ghana Pisifera, containing 153 F1 trees. We constructed a high-density linkage map containing 1357 SNPs and 123 microsatellites. The 16 linkage groups (LGs) spanned 1527 cM, with an average marker space of 1.03 cM. One significant and three suggestive QTL for oil to bunch (O/B) and oil to dry mesocarp (O/DM) were mapped on LG1, LG8, and LG10 in a F1 breeding population, respectively. These QTL explained 7.6-13.3% of phenotypic variance. DNA markers associated with oil content in these QTL were identified. Trees with beneficial genotypes at two QTL for O/B showed an average O/B of 30.97%, significantly (P < 0.01) higher than that of trees without any beneficial QTL genotypes (average O/B of 28.24%). QTL combinations showed that the higher the number of QTL with beneficial genotypes, the higher the resulting average O/B in the breeding population. A linkage map with 1480 DNA markers was constructed and used to identify QTL for oil content traits. Pyramiding the identified QTL with beneficial genotypes associated with oil content traits using DNA markers has the potential to accelerate genetic improvement for oil yield in the breeding population of oil palm.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 65 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Netherlands 1 2%
Italy 1 2%
Unknown 63 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 15 23%
Researcher 14 22%
Student > Master 6 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 8%
Student > Bachelor 4 6%
Other 10 15%
Unknown 11 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 39 60%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 12 18%
Computer Science 2 3%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 1 2%
Medicine and Dentistry 1 2%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 10 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 June 2017.
All research outputs
#6,979,186
of 11,251,036 outputs
Outputs from BMC Plant Biology
#667
of 1,357 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#150,038
of 266,619 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Plant Biology
#3
of 4 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,251,036 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,357 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.4. This one is in the 40th percentile – i.e., 40% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 266,619 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 34th percentile – i.e., 34% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 4 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one.