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Understanding and addressing contraceptive stockouts to increase family planning access and uptake in Senegal

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Health Services Research, May 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (83rd percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (77th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
4 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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2 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
29 Mendeley
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Title
Understanding and addressing contraceptive stockouts to increase family planning access and uptake in Senegal
Published in
BMC Health Services Research, May 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12913-017-2316-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Leah Hasselback, Modibo Dicko, Claire Viadro, Soussaba Ndour, Oumy Ndao, Jennifer Wesson

Abstract

Senegal's government has pledged to reduce contraceptive stockouts, which have been frequent in public sector health facilities. An innovative distribution system called the Informed Push Model (IPM) addresses supply chain obstacles through direct regional-to-facility delivery of contraceptives and use of private sector logistics operators. Following promising pilot results, Senegal's Ministry of Health and Social Action committed to a three-year (2013-2016) expansion of IPM to all public health facilities nationwide. From August 2014-July 2016, IPM's six logisticians made 29,319 visits to restock public sector health facilities. During these regular facility visits, the logisticians conducted a physical inventory to flag contraceptive stockouts (no usable stock of any single method available) and asked facility staff to identify the primary reason for documented stockouts. Our descriptive study examines stockout trends over the course of IPM scale-up. We also describe trends in contraceptive consumption over the three-year period using facility-level data collected by the logisticians. Contraceptive consumption rose by 91% over 35 months in the first three IPM regions, and by 118% in the next five regions (over 26 months). After scale-up to 1,394 health facilities, nationwide consumption rose by 48% over one year. On average, logisticians documented stockouts at fewer than 2% of facility visits. In comparison, two pre-IPM studies in 2011 identified stockouts of selected modern contraceptives at 60-70% of facilities visited, with 84% of clients reporting stockouts in the past year. Six factors (including consumption spikes, IPM-preventable causes, and community outreach) explained most remaining stockouts. IPM has been highly successful in ensuring full availability of contraceptives across regions and health facilities. The model also has facilitated the flow of essential data on consumption and stockouts from facilities up to district, regional, and central-level managers. These achievements highlight the relevance of professionalizing supply chain management while continuing to mitigate stockouts through enhanced stakeholder communication and improved training, coaching, and supervision of third-party logistics operators. Supply reliability is critical in shaping demand for and regular use of contraception. The government is transitioning the IPM to full management by the National Supply Pharmacy.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 29 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 29 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 9 31%
Unspecified 6 21%
Researcher 4 14%
Student > Postgraduate 3 10%
Other 2 7%
Other 5 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 7 24%
Medicine and Dentistry 6 21%
Nursing and Health Professions 5 17%
Social Sciences 3 10%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 7%
Other 6 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 11. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 November 2017.
All research outputs
#1,231,081
of 12,151,889 outputs
Outputs from BMC Health Services Research
#563
of 3,961 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#45,027
of 272,712 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Health Services Research
#25
of 111 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,151,889 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 89th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,961 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.2. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 272,712 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 83% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 111 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 77% of its contemporaries.