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Effects of Ramadan fasting on platelet reactivity in diabetic patients treated with clopidogrel

Overview of attention for article published in Thrombosis Journal, June 2017
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Title
Effects of Ramadan fasting on platelet reactivity in diabetic patients treated with clopidogrel
Published in
Thrombosis Journal, June 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12959-017-0138-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

W. Bouida, H. Baccouche, M. Sassi, Z. Dridi, T. Chakroun, I. Hellara, R. Boukef, M. Hassine, F. Added, R. Razgallah, I. Khochtali, S. Nouira

Abstract

The effects of Ramadan fasting (RF) on clopidogrel antiplatelet inhibition were not previously investigated. The present study evaluated the influence of RF on platelet reactivity in patients with high cardiovascular risk (CVR) in particular those with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM). A total of 98 stable patients with ≥2 CVR factors were recruited. All patients observed RF and were taking clopidogrel at a maintenance dose of 75 mg. Clinical findings and serum lipids data were recorded before Ramadan (Pre-R), at the last week of Ramadan (R) and 4 weeks after the end of Ramadan (Post-R). During each patient visit, nutrients intakes were calculated and platelet reactivity assessment using Verify Now P2Y12 assay was performed. In DM patients, the absolute PRU changes from baseline were +27 (p = 0.01) and +16 (p = 0.02) respectively at R and Post-R. In addition, there was a significant increase of glycemia and triglycerides levels with a significant decrease of high-density lipoprotein. In non DM patients there was no significant change in absolute PRU values and metabolic parameters. Clopidogrel resistance rate using 2 cut-off PRU values (235 and 208) did not change significantly in DM and non DM patients. RF significantly decreased platelet sensitivity to clopidogrel in DM patients during and after Ramadan. This effect is possibly related to an increase of glycemia and serum lipids levels induced by fasting. Clinical Trials.gov NCT02720133. Registered 24 July 2014.Retrospectively registered.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 15 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 15 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 4 27%
Researcher 3 20%
Student > Bachelor 2 13%
Professor 2 13%
Other 1 7%
Other 2 13%
Unknown 1 7%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 6 40%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 13%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 13%
Mathematics 1 7%
Social Sciences 1 7%
Other 1 7%
Unknown 2 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 June 2017.
All research outputs
#9,795,067
of 12,260,202 outputs
Outputs from Thrombosis Journal
#121
of 156 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#195,149
of 271,453 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Thrombosis Journal
#5
of 6 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,260,202 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 156 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.8. This one is in the 7th percentile – i.e., 7% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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