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Serum thyroid-stimulating hormone and interleukin-8 levels in boys with autism spectrum disorder

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Neuroinflammation, June 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#5 of 2,036)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
20 news outlets
blogs
2 blogs
twitter
25 tweeters
facebook
5 Facebook pages
reddit
1 Redditor

Citations

dimensions_citation
11 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
41 Mendeley
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Title
Serum thyroid-stimulating hormone and interleukin-8 levels in boys with autism spectrum disorder
Published in
Journal of Neuroinflammation, June 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12974-017-0888-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Sarika Singh, Umar Yazdani, Bharathi Gadad, Sayed Zaman, Linda S. Hynan, Nichole Roatch, Claire Schutte, C. Nathan Marti, Laura Hewitson, Dwight C. German

Abstract

Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) affects approximately 1 in 68 children in the USA. An ASD blood biomarker may enable early diagnosis and/or identification of new therapeutic targets. Serum samples from ASD and typically developing (TD) boys (n = 30/group) were screened for differences in 110 proteins using a multiplex immunoassay. Eleven proteins were found that together could confirm ASD with modest accuracy using multiple training and test sets. Two of the 11 proteins identified here were further tested using a different detection platform and with a larger sample of ASD and TD boys. The two proteins, thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) and interleukin-8 (IL-8), have been previously identified as putative biomarkers for ASD. TSH levels were significantly lower in ASD boys, whereas IL-8 levels were significantly elevated. The diagnostic accuracy for ASD based upon TSH or IL-8 levels alone varied from 74 to 76%, but using both proteins together, the diagnostic accuracy increased to 82%. In addition, TSH levels were negatively correlated with the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule subdomain scores. These data suggest that a panel of proteins may be useful as a putative blood biomarker for ASD.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 25 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 41 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 41 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 24%
Student > Master 7 17%
Student > Bachelor 6 15%
Researcher 4 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 2%
Other 3 7%
Unknown 10 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 9 22%
Medicine and Dentistry 5 12%
Neuroscience 4 10%
Engineering 2 5%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 5%
Other 6 15%
Unknown 13 32%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 176. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 April 2019.
All research outputs
#113,546
of 16,291,088 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Neuroinflammation
#5
of 2,036 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#3,854
of 273,926 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Neuroinflammation
#1
of 3 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,291,088 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,036 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.6. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 273,926 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 3 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them