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The effects of local variation in light availability on pollinator visitation, pollen and resource limitation of female reproduction in Hosta ventricosa

Overview of attention for article published in Botanical Studies, June 2017
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Title
The effects of local variation in light availability on pollinator visitation, pollen and resource limitation of female reproduction in Hosta ventricosa
Published in
Botanical Studies, June 2017
DOI 10.1186/s40529-017-0180-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Cao, Guo-Xing, Wu, Bi-Xian, Xu, Xu-Jian, Wang, Xie, Yang, Chun-Ping, Guo-Xing Cao, Bi-Xian Wu, Xu-Jian Xu, Xie Wang, Chun-Ping Yang

Abstract

Light availability may have direct effects on reproduction through resource availability, and indirect effects on female reproduction by influencing plant-pollinator interactions. Floral display size, pollinator visitation per flower, resource and pollen limitation of fruit and seed production were quantified in a forested patch and an adjacent open patch of two populations of the perennial herb Hosta ventricosa. Plants in the open patch produced significantly larger floral displays than those in the forested patch in both populations. Floral display size had a positive effect on pollinator visitation rate per flower in one population, but no effect in the other. Plants in the open patch received approximately 8-11 times more visitation rates and produced significantly more fruit and seeds per flower than those in the forested patch. However, supplemental pollination resulted in significantly more fruit and seed production per flower compared to natural pollination in the forested patch but not in the open patch in one population, and did not enhance fruit and seed production in either the forested or the open patch in the other. In both populations, supplementally pollinated plants in the open patch produced significantly more fruit and seeds per flower than supplementally pollinated plants in the forested patch. In H. ventricosa, local variation in light conditions could affect pollinator activity and influence female reproduction through resource availability; however differences in the degree of pollen limitation between local habitats were found to be population-specific.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 24 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 24 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 7 29%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 13%
Student > Master 3 13%
Other 2 8%
Lecturer 2 8%
Other 2 8%
Unknown 5 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 8 33%
Environmental Science 4 17%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 8%
Energy 1 4%
Medicine and Dentistry 1 4%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 8 33%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 June 2017.
All research outputs
#9,995,753
of 11,275,700 outputs
Outputs from Botanical Studies
#62
of 91 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#223,059
of 267,489 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Botanical Studies
#3
of 4 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,275,700 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 91 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.1. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 4 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one.