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Metabolic 'engines' of flight drive genome size reduction in birds

Overview of attention for article published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, January 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (95th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (70th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
twitter
24 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page
wikipedia
2 Wikipedia pages
googleplus
1 Google+ user

Citations

dimensions_citation
29 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
106 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
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Title
Metabolic 'engines' of flight drive genome size reduction in birds
Published in
Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, January 2014
DOI 10.1098/rspb.2013.2780
Pubmed ID
Authors

N. A. Wright, T. R. Gregory, C. C. Witt

Abstract

The tendency for flying organisms to possess small genomes has been interpreted as evidence of natural selection acting on the physical size of the genome. Nonetheless, the flight-genome link and its mechanistic basis have yet to be well established by comparative studies within a volant clade. Is there a particular functional aspect of flight such as brisk metabolism, lift production or maneuverability that impinges on the physical genome? We measured genome sizes, wing dimensions and heart, flight muscle and body masses from a phylogenetically diverse set of bird species. In phylogenetically controlled analyses, we found that genome size was negatively correlated with relative flight muscle size and heart index (i.e. ratio of heart to body mass), but positively correlated with body mass and wing loading. The proportional masses of the flight muscles and heart were the most important parameters explaining variation in genome size in multivariate models. Hence, the metabolic intensity of powered flight appears to have driven genome size reduction in birds.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 24 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 106 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 11 10%
United Kingdom 2 2%
India 1 <1%
Japan 1 <1%
Romania 1 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of 1 <1%
Unknown 88 83%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 28 26%
Researcher 20 19%
Student > Bachelor 13 12%
Student > Master 12 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 10 9%
Other 23 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 71 67%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 17 16%
Unspecified 6 6%
Environmental Science 5 5%
Medicine and Dentistry 5 5%
Other 2 2%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 26. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 March 2018.
All research outputs
#569,500
of 12,826,759 outputs
Outputs from Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
#1,807
of 7,248 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#11,520
of 241,965 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
#47
of 158 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,826,759 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 95th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 7,248 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 28.1. This one has done well, scoring higher than 75% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 241,965 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 158 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 70% of its contemporaries.