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The genomic landscape of Neanderthal ancestry in present-day humans

Overview of attention for article published in Nature, January 2014
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  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (98th percentile)

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Title
The genomic landscape of Neanderthal ancestry in present-day humans
Published in
Nature, January 2014
DOI 10.1038/nature12961
Pubmed ID
Authors

Sriram Sankararaman, Swapan Mallick, Michael Dannemann, Kay Prüfer, Janet Kelso, Svante Pääbo, Nick Patterson, David Reich

Abstract

Genomic studies have shown that Neanderthals interbred with modern humans, and that non-Africans today are the products of this mixture. The antiquity of Neanderthal gene flow into modern humans means that genomic regions that derive from Neanderthals in any one human today are usually less than a hundred kilobases in size. However, Neanderthal haplotypes are also distinctive enough that several studies have been able to detect Neanderthal ancestry at specific loci. We systematically infer Neanderthal haplotypes in the genomes of 1,004 present-day humans. Regions that harbour a high frequency of Neanderthal alleles are enriched for genes affecting keratin filaments, suggesting that Neanderthal alleles may have helped modern humans to adapt to non-African environments. We identify multiple Neanderthal-derived alleles that confer risk for disease, suggesting that Neanderthal alleles continue to shape human biology. An unexpected finding is that regions with reduced Neanderthal ancestry are enriched in genes, implying selection to remove genetic material derived from Neanderthals. Genes that are more highly expressed in testes than in any other tissue are especially reduced in Neanderthal ancestry, and there is an approximately fivefold reduction of Neanderthal ancestry on the X chromosome, which is known from studies of diverse species to be especially dense in male hybrid sterility genes. These results suggest that part of the explanation for genomic regions of reduced Neanderthal ancestry is Neanderthal alleles that caused decreased fertility in males when moved to a modern human genetic background.

Twitter Demographics

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Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 33 3%
United Kingdom 15 1%
Germany 10 <1%
France 7 <1%
Brazil 6 <1%
Japan 3 <1%
Spain 3 <1%
Austria 2 <1%
China 2 <1%
Other 24 2%
Unknown 1013 91%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 289 26%
Researcher 218 19%
Student > Bachelor 164 15%
Student > Master 128 11%
Unspecified 64 6%
Other 255 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 559 50%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 189 17%
Unspecified 98 9%
Social Sciences 55 5%
Arts and Humanities 51 5%
Other 166 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1127. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 September 2019.
All research outputs
#3,145
of 13,643,824 outputs
Outputs from Nature
#529
of 70,297 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#43
of 247,378 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nature
#14
of 930 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,643,824 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 70,297 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 77.1. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 247,378 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 930 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.