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Language from police body camera footage shows racial disparities in officer respect

Overview of attention for article published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, June 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
81 news outlets
blogs
7 blogs
policy
1 policy source
twitter
830 tweeters
facebook
6 Facebook pages
wikipedia
3 Wikipedia pages
googleplus
2 Google+ users
reddit
2 Redditors

Citations

dimensions_citation
159 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
357 Mendeley
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Title
Language from police body camera footage shows racial disparities in officer respect
Published in
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, June 2017
DOI 10.1073/pnas.1702413114
Pubmed ID
Authors

Rob Voigt, Nicholas P. Camp, Vinodkumar Prabhakaran, William L. Hamilton, Rebecca C. Hetey, Camilla M. Griffiths, David Jurgens, Dan Jurafsky, Jennifer L. Eberhardt

Abstract

Using footage from body-worn cameras, we analyze the respectfulness of police officer language toward white and black community members during routine traffic stops. We develop computational linguistic methods that extract levels of respect automatically from transcripts, informed by a thin-slicing study of participant ratings of officer utterances. We find that officers speak with consistently less respect toward black versus white community members, even after controlling for the race of the officer, the severity of the infraction, the location of the stop, and the outcome of the stop. Such disparities in common, everyday interactions between police and the communities they serve have important implications for procedural justice and the building of police-community trust.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 830 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 357 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 <1%
Unknown 356 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 101 28%
Student > Master 44 12%
Researcher 38 11%
Student > Bachelor 35 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 31 9%
Other 58 16%
Unknown 50 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Social Sciences 82 23%
Psychology 74 21%
Computer Science 36 10%
Linguistics 20 6%
Business, Management and Accounting 14 4%
Other 66 18%
Unknown 65 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1332. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 November 2022.
All research outputs
#7,729
of 22,636,521 outputs
Outputs from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#248
of 98,067 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#131
of 292,087 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#6
of 915 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,636,521 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 98,067 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 36.7. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 292,087 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 915 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.