↓ Skip to main content

Transcriptional Control of Lineage Differentiation in Immune Cells

Overview of attention for book
Attention for Chapter 378: Transcriptional Control of Dendritic Cell Differentiation.
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (51st percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (68th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
2 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
3 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
11 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Chapter title
Transcriptional Control of Dendritic Cell Differentiation.
Chapter number 378
Book title
Transcriptional Control of Lineage Differentiation in Immune Cells
Published in
Current topics in microbiology and immunology, May 2014
DOI 10.1007/82_2014_378
Pubmed ID
Book ISBNs
978-3-31-907394-1, 978-3-31-907395-8
Authors

Izumi Sasaki, Tsuneyasu Kaisho

Editors

Wilfried Ellmeier, Ichiro Taniuchi

Abstract

Dendritic cells (DCs) are professional antigen presenting cells involved critically not only in provoking innate immune responses but also in establishing adaptive immune responses. Dendritic cells are heterogenous and divided into several subsets, including plasmactyoid DCs (pDCs) and several types of conventional DCs (cDCs), which show subset-specific functions. Plasmactyoid DCs are featured by their ability to produce large amounts of type I interferons (IFNs) in response to nucleic acid sensors, TLR7 and TLR9 and involved in anti-viral immunity and pathogenesis of certain autoimmune disorders such as psoriasis. Conventional DCs include the DC subsets with high crosspresentation activity, which contributes to anti-viral and anti-tumor immunity. These subsets are generated from hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) via several intermediate progenitors and the development is regulated by the transcriptional mechanisms in which subset-specific transcription factors play major roles. We have recently found that an Ets family transcription factor, SPI-B, which is abundantly expressed in pDCs among DC subsets, plays critical roles in functions and late stage development of pDCs. SPI-B functions in cooperation with other transcription factors, especially, interferon regulatory factor (IRF) family members. Here we review the transcription factor-based molecular mechanisms for generation and functions of DCs, mainly by focusing on the roles of SPI-B and its relatives.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 11 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 11 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 36%
Researcher 3 27%
Student > Bachelor 2 18%
Lecturer > Senior Lecturer 1 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 9%
Other 0 0%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 36%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 27%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 18%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 9%
Unspecified 1 9%
Other 0 0%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 March 2015.
All research outputs
#2,397,958
of 4,833,580 outputs
Outputs from Current topics in microbiology and immunology
#172
of 329 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#52,513
of 115,885 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Current topics in microbiology and immunology
#3
of 16 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 4,833,580 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 329 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.2. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 115,885 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 51% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 16 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 68% of its contemporaries.