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Strategies for Promoting High-Quality Care and Personal Resilience in Palliative Care

Overview of attention for article published in AMA Journal of Ethics, June 2017
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Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
17 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages

Citations

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11 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
25 Mendeley
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Title
Strategies for Promoting High-Quality Care and Personal Resilience in Palliative Care
Published in
AMA Journal of Ethics, June 2017
DOI 10.1001/journalofethics.2017.19.6.pfor2-1706
Pubmed ID
Abstract

Palliative care (PC) clinicians are faced with ever-expanding pressures, which can make it difficult to fulfill their duties to self and others and lead to moral distress. Understanding the pressures that PC clinicians face and the resources that could be employed to ease their moral distress is crucial to maintaining a healthy PC workforce and to providing necessary PC services to patients. In this paper, we discuss recommendations related to two promising pathways for supporting PC clinicians in providing high-quality PC: (1) improving systemic PC delivery and (2) strategies to promote ethical practice environments and individual resilience. Enacting these recommendations holds promise for sustaining higher-quality and accessible PC and a more engaged PC workforce.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 17 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 25 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 25 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Other 4 16%
Student > Bachelor 3 12%
Professor 3 12%
Student > Postgraduate 2 8%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 8%
Other 7 28%
Unknown 4 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 5 20%
Nursing and Health Professions 5 20%
Social Sciences 4 16%
Neuroscience 3 12%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 4%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 7 28%