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Scaling up contraceptives use in the division with lowest contraceptives use in Bangladesh: sources, methods, and determinants

Overview of attention for article published in Maternal Health, Neonatology and Perinatology, June 2017
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5 tweeters

Citations

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2 Dimensions

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23 Mendeley
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Title
Scaling up contraceptives use in the division with lowest contraceptives use in Bangladesh: sources, methods, and determinants
Published in
Maternal Health, Neonatology and Perinatology, June 2017
DOI 10.1186/s40748-017-0049-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Gulam Muhammed Al Kibria, Vanessa Burrowes, Sharmin Majumder, Atia Sharmeen, Rifath Ara Alam Barsha, Shakir Hossen

Abstract

Total fertility rate (TFR) is high and at a static level for the last two decades in Bangladesh. Reduction of fertility by increasing contraceptives use could reduce maternal and neonatal mortality. To achieve the targeted contraceptive prevalence rate (CPR) of Family Planning 2020 (FP2020) Initiative, it is important to increase CPR in all regions of the country. However, it is lower in Sylhet Division compared to other divisions in Bangladesh. This study looked into the methods, source and determinants of contraceptives use in this division. Data from the Bangladesh Demographic and Health Survey 2014 (BDHS 2014) were analyzed. After reporting the sources of obtaining contraceptives and choice of methods, distributions of contraceptives use were reported by selected characteristics. Logistic regression was applied to calculate the odds ratios. A total of 599 women were analyzed. CPR was lower in rural areas compared to urban areas, 45.4% and 58.5%, respectively. The majority of the women received services from governmental sectors. The birth control pill was the most common contraceptive method. The proportion of women using long-acting permanent methods was low (<10%) in both urban and rural areas. In the multivariate analyses, number of alive children (adjusted odds ratio (AOR) of ≥5 children: 1.6, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.1-2.2), presence of a male child (AOR: 1.7; 95% CI: 1.1-2.6), higher education level of the husband (AOR: 1.7; 95% CI: 1.1-2.6), receiving a visit from a family planning worker (AOR: 2.4; 95% CI: 1.6-3.4) and membership in a non-governmental organization (AOR:1.4, 95% CI: 1.1-1.8) were positively associated with contraceptives use in Sylhet after controlling for age, education level and other contextual factors. Conversely, rural women had the lower likelihood of using contraceptives (AOR: 0.6; 95% CI: 0.4-0.8) than urban women. Women's education level and religion were not statistically significant. A comprehensive strategy is required for this division to address multiple factors which simultaneously influence contraceptives use. In addition to more awareness programs to increase contraceptives use, providing contraceptive distribution services through family planning workers, involving women with non-governmental organizations and prioritizing rural areas could increase contraceptives use in Sylhet Division.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 23 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 23 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 4 17%
Lecturer 3 13%
Professor > Associate Professor 2 9%
Researcher 2 9%
Student > Postgraduate 2 9%
Other 5 22%
Unknown 5 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 6 26%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 13%
Social Sciences 3 13%
Psychology 2 9%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 4%
Other 1 4%
Unknown 7 30%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 July 2017.
All research outputs
#6,543,330
of 11,419,765 outputs
Outputs from Maternal Health, Neonatology and Perinatology
#19
of 37 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#128,412
of 268,058 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Maternal Health, Neonatology and Perinatology
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,419,765 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 40th percentile – i.e., 40% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 37 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.1. This one scored the same or higher as 18 of them.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 268,058 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them