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Correlates of early neonatal feeding practice in Dabat HDSS site, northwest Ethiopia

Overview of attention for article published in International Breastfeeding Journal, June 2017
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Title
Correlates of early neonatal feeding practice in Dabat HDSS site, northwest Ethiopia
Published in
International Breastfeeding Journal, June 2017
DOI 10.1186/s13006-017-0116-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Terefe Derso, Gashaw Andargie Biks, Amare Tariku, Nigusie Birhan Tebeje, Zemichael Gizaw, Kindie Fentahun Muchie, Alemayehu Shimeka, Yigzaw Kebede, Solomon Mekonnen Abebe, Mezgebu Yitayal, Tadesse Awoke Ayele, Mamo Wubeshet, Temesgen Azmeraw, Melkamu Birku, Abel Fekadu, Geta Asrade, Abebaw Gebeyehu, Adino Tesfahun, Kassahun Alemu

Abstract

Delaying the start of breastfeeding and giving prelacteal feeding leads to a significant increase in neonatal and infant deaths, particularly in a resource limited countries, like Ethiopia. Therefore, this study aimed to assess early neonatal feeding practice and its determinants in Dabat HDSS site, northwest Ethiopia. The census for the reconciliation of the surveillance of the Dabat Health and Demographic Surveillance System (HDSS) site was conducted from October to December 2014. Data were entered into the Household Registration System (HRS) version 2.1 and analyzed using Stata version 14. A total of 6,761 mother-child pairs were included in the study. Sociodemographic factors, maternal health care and early neonatal feeding practices (early initiation of breastfeeding and prelacteal feeding) were collected by interviewing the mothers. The prevalence of early/timely initiation of breastfeeding was computed as the ratio of children put to the breast within one hour of delivery to the total number of children. Prelacteal feeding was defined as giving anything to drink other than breast milk in the first three days following birth. Binary logistic regression models were used to identify variables which were associated with the dependent variable. A multivariable logistic regression analysis was carried out to identify factors associated with early initiation of breastfeeding. The prevalence of early initiation of breastfeeding was 43.9% (95% CI, 41.6, 46.2). More than half (56%) of the mothers gave prelacteal feeds. An urban residence (Adjusted Odds Ratio [AOR] 1.47, 95% Confidence Interval [CI] 1.25. 1.73) and antenatal care (AOR 1.41, 95% CI 1.24, 1.59) were correlated with early initiation of breastfeeding. Similarly, increased odds of timely initiation of breastfeeding were observed among mothers who didn't give prelacteal feeds (AOR 5.72; 95% CI, 5.12, 6.40). Delayed initiation of breastfeeding and prelacteal feeding still remain public health concerns in this community. The promotion of improved infant and young child feeding (IYCF) practices and the utilization of antenatal care services should be intensified.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 85 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Ghana 1 1%
Unknown 84 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 22 26%
Student > Bachelor 11 13%
Lecturer 7 8%
Researcher 6 7%
Student > Postgraduate 6 7%
Other 13 15%
Unknown 20 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 28 33%
Nursing and Health Professions 24 28%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 5%
Social Sciences 2 2%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 1%
Other 4 5%
Unknown 22 26%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 June 2017.
All research outputs
#6,774,141
of 11,332,694 outputs
Outputs from International Breastfeeding Journal
#176
of 229 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#138,602
of 267,218 outputs
Outputs of similar age from International Breastfeeding Journal
#5
of 7 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,332,694 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 229 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.0. This one is in the 18th percentile – i.e., 18% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 267,218 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 7 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 2 of them.