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Initiatives for Responding to Medical Trainees' Moral Distress about End-of-Life Cases

Overview of attention for article published in AMA Journal of Ethics, June 2017
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89 tweeters
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2 Facebook pages

Citations

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4 Dimensions

Readers on

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26 Mendeley
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Title
Initiatives for Responding to Medical Trainees' Moral Distress about End-of-Life Cases
Published in
AMA Journal of Ethics, June 2017
DOI 10.1001/journalofethics.2017.19.6.stas1-1706
Pubmed ID
Abstract

Moral distress frequently arises for medical trainees exposed to end-of-life cases. We review the small literature on best practices for reducing moral distress in such cases and propose two areas to target for moral distress reduction: medical education and organizational ethics programs. Students require training in end-of-life dialogues and truthful prognostication, which are not generally available without skilled mentors. But physician-mentors and teachers can suffer from lingering moral residue themselves, which can affect the teaching culture and student expectations. Finally, reducing unit moral distress that affects learners requires formal educational opportunities to debrief about difficult end-of-life cases and formal institutional mechanisms for effective clinical ethics consultation.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 89 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 26 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 26 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Doctoral Student 6 23%
Researcher 5 19%
Librarian 3 12%
Student > Master 2 8%
Student > Bachelor 2 8%
Other 4 15%
Unknown 4 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 9 35%
Nursing and Health Professions 8 31%
Unspecified 1 4%
Unknown 8 31%