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Depletion Mapping and Constrained Optimization to Support Managing Groundwater Extraction

Overview of attention for article published in Ground Water, June 2017
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2 tweeters

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4 Dimensions

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9 Mendeley
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Title
Depletion Mapping and Constrained Optimization to Support Managing Groundwater Extraction
Published in
Ground Water, June 2017
DOI 10.1111/gwat.12536
Pubmed ID
Authors

Michael N. Fienen, Kenneth R. Bradbury, Maribeth Kniffin, Paul M. Barlow

Abstract

Groundwater models often serve as management tools to evaluate competing water uses including ecosystems, irrigated agriculture, industry, municipal supply, and others. Depletion potential mapping-showing the model-calculated potential impacts that wells have on stream baseflow-can form the basis for multiple potential management approaches in an oversubscribed basin. Specific management approaches can include scenarios proposed by stakeholders, systematic changes in well pumping based on depletion potential, and formal constrained optimization, which can be used to quantify the tradeoff between water use and stream baseflow. Variables such as the maximum amount of reduction allowed in each well and various groupings of wells using, for example, K-means clustering considering spatial proximity and depletion potential are considered. These approaches provide a potential starting point and guidance for resource managers and stakeholders to make decisions about groundwater management in a basin, spreading responsibility in different ways. We illustrate these approaches in the Little Plover River basin in central Wisconsin, United States-home to a rich agricultural tradition, with farmland and urban areas both in close proximity to a groundwater-dependent trout stream. Groundwater withdrawals have reduced baseflow supplying the Little Plover River below a legally established minimum. The techniques in this work were developed in response to engaged stakeholders with various interests and goals for the basin. They sought to develop a collaborative management plan at a watershed scale that restores the flow rate in the river in a manner that incorporates principles of shared governance and results in effective and minimally disruptive changes in groundwater extraction practices.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 9 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 9 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 3 33%
Student > Postgraduate 2 22%
Librarian 2 22%
Researcher 1 11%
Unspecified 1 11%
Other 0 0%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Engineering 2 22%
Environmental Science 2 22%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 2 22%
Unspecified 2 22%
Arts and Humanities 1 11%
Other 0 0%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 February 2018.
All research outputs
#7,876,432
of 12,553,253 outputs
Outputs from Ground Water
#465
of 559 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#151,145
of 265,809 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Ground Water
#6
of 14 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,553,253 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 559 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.2. This one is in the 10th percentile – i.e., 10% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 14 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.