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Increasing probability of mortality during Indian heat waves

Overview of attention for article published in Science Advances, June 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (96th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
61 news outlets
blogs
11 blogs
twitter
113 tweeters
facebook
6 Facebook pages
googleplus
7 Google+ users
reddit
1 Redditor

Readers on

mendeley
86 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
Title
Increasing probability of mortality during Indian heat waves
Published in
Science Advances, June 2017
DOI 10.1126/sciadv.1700066
Pubmed ID
Authors

Omid Mazdiyasni, Amir AghaKouchak, Steven J. Davis, Shahrbanou Madadgar, Ali Mehran, Elisa Ragno, Mojtaba Sadegh, Ashmita Sengupta, Subimal Ghosh, C. T. Dhanya, Mohsen Niknejad

Abstract

Rising global temperatures are causing increases in the frequency and severity of extreme climatic events, such as floods, droughts, and heat waves. We analyze changes in summer temperatures, the frequency, severity, and duration of heat waves, and heat-related mortality in India between 1960 and 2009 using data from the India Meteorological Department. Mean temperatures across India have risen by more than 0.5°C over this period, with statistically significant increases in heat waves. Using a novel probabilistic model, we further show that the increase in summer mean temperatures in India over this period corresponds to a 146% increase in the probability of heat-related mortality events of more than 100 people. In turn, our results suggest that future climate warming will lead to substantial increases in heat-related mortality, particularly in developing low-latitude countries, such as India, where heat waves will become more frequent and populations are especially vulnerable to these extreme temperatures. Our findings indicate that even moderate increases in mean temperatures may cause great increases in heat-related mortality and support the efforts of governments and international organizations to build up the resilience of these vulnerable regions to more severe heat waves.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 113 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 86 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
India 1 1%
Chile 1 1%
United States 1 1%
Belgium 1 1%
Unknown 82 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 28 33%
Researcher 16 19%
Unspecified 9 10%
Student > Master 8 9%
Other 6 7%
Other 19 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 22 26%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 20 23%
Engineering 15 17%
Unspecified 13 15%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 6%
Other 11 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 655. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 January 2018.
All research outputs
#6,319
of 10,612,556 outputs
Outputs from Science Advances
#66
of 1,851 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#437
of 265,697 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Science Advances
#8
of 222 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 10,612,556 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,851 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 126.0. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 265,697 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 222 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.