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A chondromimetic microsphere for in situ spatially controlled chondrogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Controlled Release, April 2014
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Title
A chondromimetic microsphere for in situ spatially controlled chondrogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells
Published in
Journal of Controlled Release, April 2014
DOI 10.1016/j.jconrel.2014.01.023
Pubmed ID
Authors

Sharon Ansboro, Jessica S. Hayes, Valerie Barron, Shane Browne, Linda Howard, Udo Greiser, Pierce Lalor, Fintan Shannon, Frank P. Barry, Abhay Pandit, J. Mary Murphy

Abstract

Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) have been identified as a viable cell source for cartilage tissue engineering. However, to undergo chondrogenic differentiation hMSCs require growth factors, in particular members of the transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) family. While in vitro differentiation is feasible through continuous supplementation of TGF-β3, mechanisms to control and drive hMSCs down the chondrogenic lineage in their native microenvironment remain a significant challenge. The release of TGF-β3 from an injectable microsphere composed of the cartilage-associated extracellular matrix molecule hyaluronan represents a readily translatable approach for in situ differentiation of hMSCs for cartilage repair. In this study, chondromimetic hyaluronan microspheres were used as a growth factor delivery source for hMSC chondrogenesis. Cellular compatibility of the microspheres (1.2 and 14.1 μm) with hMSCs was shown and release of TGF-β3 from the most promising 14.1 μm microspheres to control differentiation of hMSCs was evaluated. Enhanced accumulation of cartilage-associated glycosaminoglycans by hMSCs incubated with TGF-β3-loaded microspheres was seen and positive staining for collagen type II and proteoglycan confirmed successful in vitro chondrogenesis. Gene expression analysis showed significantly increased expression of the chondrocyte-associated genes, collagen type II and aggrecan. This delivery platform resulted in significantly less collagen type X expression, suggesting the generation of a more stable cartilage phenotype. When evaluated in an ex vivo osteoarthritic cartilage model, implanted hMSCs with TGF-β3-loaded HA microspheres were detected within cartilage fibrillations and increased proteoglycan staining was seen in the tissue. In summary, data presented here demonstrate that TGF-β3-bound hyaluronan microspheres provide a suitable delivery system for induction of hMSC chondrogenesis and their use may represent a clinically feasible tissue engineering approach for the treatment of articular cartilage defects.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 53 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 1 2%
United Kingdom 1 2%
United States 1 2%
Unknown 50 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 15 28%
Researcher 10 19%
Student > Bachelor 6 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 8%
Student > Master 4 8%
Other 14 26%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Engineering 11 21%
Medicine and Dentistry 10 19%
Materials Science 8 15%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 7 13%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 6 11%
Other 11 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 February 2014.
All research outputs
#9,635,372
of 12,044,660 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Controlled Release
#4,842
of 6,040 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#145,693
of 214,181 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Controlled Release
#49
of 60 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,044,660 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 6,040 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.1. This one is in the 13th percentile – i.e., 13% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 214,181 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 16th percentile – i.e., 16% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 60 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 6th percentile – i.e., 6% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.