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Diet and body fat in adolescence and early adulthood: a systematic review of longitudinal studies

Overview of attention for article published in Ciência & Saúde Coletiva, May 2017
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (61st percentile)

Mentioned by

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2 tweeters

Citations

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10 Dimensions

Readers on

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43 Mendeley
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Title
Diet and body fat in adolescence and early adulthood: a systematic review of longitudinal studies
Published in
Ciência & Saúde Coletiva, May 2017
DOI 10.1590/1413-81232017225.13972015
Pubmed ID
Authors

Bruna Celestino Schneider, Samuel Carvalho Dumith, Silvana Paiva Orlandi, Maria Cecília Formoso Assunção

Abstract

Adipose tissue is a vital component of the human body, but in excess, it represents a risk to health. According to the World Health Organization, one of the main factors determining excessive body adiposity is the dietary habit. This systematic review investigated longitudinal studies that assessed the association between diet and body fat in adolescents and young adults. Twenty-one relevant papers published between 2001 and 2015 were selected. The most used method for estimating body fat was the body mass index (15 studies). Diet was most commonly assessed by estimating the consumption of food groups (cereals, milk and dairy products) and specific foods (sugar-sweetened beverages, soft drinks, fast foods, milk, etc.). Ten studies found a direct association between diet and quantity of body fat. During adolescence, adhering to a dietary pattern characterized by high consumption of energy-dense food, fast foods, sugar-sweetened beverages and soft drinks, as well as low fiber intake, appears to contribute to an increase in body fat in early adulthood. The findings of the present study suggest that the frequent consumption of unhealthy foods and food groups (higher energy density and lower nutrient content) in adolescence is associated with higher quantity of body fat in early adulthood.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 43 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 43 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Doctoral Student 3 7%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 5%
Student > Master 1 2%
Researcher 1 2%
Student > Postgraduate 1 2%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 35 81%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 2 5%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 2%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 1 2%
Psychology 1 2%
Engineering 1 2%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 37 86%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 September 2017.
All research outputs
#6,994,372
of 11,700,978 outputs
Outputs from Ciência & Saúde Coletiva
#135
of 469 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#140,908
of 271,387 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Ciência & Saúde Coletiva
#4
of 13 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,700,978 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 38th percentile – i.e., 38% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 469 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.3. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 66% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 271,387 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 13 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 61% of its contemporaries.