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Distinct DNA methylation profiles in subtypes of orofacial cleft

Overview of attention for article published in Clinical Epigenetics, June 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#36 of 808)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (91st percentile)

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2 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
twitter
5 tweeters

Citations

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35 Dimensions

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46 Mendeley
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Title
Distinct DNA methylation profiles in subtypes of orofacial cleft
Published in
Clinical Epigenetics, June 2017
DOI 10.1186/s13148-017-0362-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Gemma C. Sharp, Karen Ho, Amy Davies, Evie Stergiakouli, Kerry Humphries, Wendy McArdle, Jonathan Sandy, George Davey Smith, Sarah J. Lewis, Caroline L. Relton

Abstract

Epigenetic data could help identify risk factors for orofacial clefts, either by revealing a causal role for epigenetic mechanisms in causing clefts or by capturing information about causal genetic or environmental factors. Given the evidence that different subtypes of orofacial cleft have distinct aetiologies, we explored whether children with different cleft subtypes showed distinct epigenetic profiles. In whole-blood samples from 150 children from the Cleft Collective cohort study, we measured DNA methylation at over 450,000 sites on the genome. We then carried out epigenome-wide association studies (EWAS) to test the association between methylation at each site and cleft subtype (cleft lip only (CLO) n = 50; cleft palate only (CPO) n = 50; cleft lip and palate (CLP) n = 50). We also compared methylation in the blood to methylation in the lip or palate tissue using genome-wide data from the same 150 children and conducted an EWAS of CLO compared to CLP in lip tissue. We found four genomic regions in blood differentially methylated in CLO compared to CLP, 17 in CPO compared to CLP and 294 in CPO compared to CLO. Several regions mapped to genes that have previously been implicated in the development of orofacial clefts (for example, TBX1, COL11A2, HOXA2, PDGFRA), and over 250 associations were novel. Methylation in blood correlated with that in lip/palate at some regions. There were 14 regions differentially methylated in the lip tissue from children with CLO and CLP, with one region (near KIAA0415) showing up in both the blood and lip EWAS. Our finding of distinct methylation profiles in different orofacial cleft (OFC) subtypes represents a promising first step in exploring the potential role of epigenetic modifications in the aetiology of OFCs and/or as clinically useful biomarkers of OFC subtypes.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 46 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 46 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 9 20%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 11%
Student > Postgraduate 4 9%
Researcher 4 9%
Student > Master 3 7%
Other 9 20%
Unknown 12 26%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 16 35%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 8 17%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 4%
Computer Science 2 4%
Unspecified 1 2%
Other 4 9%
Unknown 13 28%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 24. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 26 June 2017.
All research outputs
#835,278
of 15,466,176 outputs
Outputs from Clinical Epigenetics
#36
of 808 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#24,221
of 271,675 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Clinical Epigenetics
#1
of 3 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,466,176 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 94th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 808 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.9. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 271,675 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 3 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them