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Distinct homotypic B-cell receptor interactions shape the outcome of chronic lymphocytic leukaemia

Overview of attention for article published in Nature Communications, June 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (91st percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (76th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
blogs
1 blog
twitter
8 tweeters
patent
5 patents

Citations

dimensions_citation
34 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
59 Mendeley
Title
Distinct homotypic B-cell receptor interactions shape the outcome of chronic lymphocytic leukaemia
Published in
Nature Communications, June 2017
DOI 10.1038/ncomms15746
Pubmed ID
URN
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-326495
Authors

Claudia Minici, Maria Gounari, Rudolf Übelhart, Lydia Scarfò, Marcus Dühren-von Minden, Dunja Schneider, Alpaslan Tasdogan, Alabbas Alkhatib, Andreas Agathangelidis, Stavroula Ntoufa, Nicholas Chiorazzi, Hassan Jumaa, Kostas Stamatopoulos, Paolo Ghia, Massimo Degano

Abstract

Cell-autonomous B-cell receptor (BcR)-mediated signalling is a hallmark feature of the neoplastic B lymphocytes in chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL). Here we elucidate the structural basis of autonomous activation of CLL B cells, showing that BcR immunoglobulins initiate intracellular signalling through homotypic interactions between epitopes that are specific for each subgroup of patients with homogeneous clinicobiological profiles. The molecular details of the BcR-BcR interactions apparently dictate the clinical course of disease, with stronger affinities and longer half-lives in indolent cases, and weaker, short-lived contacts mediating the aggressive ones. The diversity of homotypic BcR contacts leading to cell-autonomous signalling reconciles the existence of a shared pathogenic mechanism with the biological and clinical heterogeneity of CLL and offers opportunities for innovative treatment strategies.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 8 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 59 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Switzerland 1 2%
Unknown 58 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 13 22%
Student > Ph. D. Student 12 20%
Professor 6 10%
Student > Postgraduate 5 8%
Student > Bachelor 5 8%
Other 13 22%
Unknown 5 8%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 14 24%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 13 22%
Immunology and Microbiology 11 19%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 11 19%
Computer Science 2 3%
Other 3 5%
Unknown 5 8%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 27. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 25 September 2019.
All research outputs
#712,248
of 14,884,620 outputs
Outputs from Nature Communications
#10,285
of 27,995 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#22,017
of 269,745 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nature Communications
#6
of 26 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,884,620 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 95th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 27,995 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 48.1. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 63% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 269,745 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 26 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 76% of its contemporaries.